Honey, you’ve gone too far!

honey you've gone too far 1

The gist of this editorial seems to be that only the tinest breasted ladies can wear the Ossies, but I have to respectfully and fundamentally disagree. The Ossie tunic on the cover was, along with some matching trousers, later chosen as The Fashion Museum‘s Dress of the Year 1969.

Blonde model photographed by Mike Berkofsky.

Brunette model photographed by Steve Hiett.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Honey Magazine, November 1968.

honey you've gone too far 2

Fluffy frilly blouse by Quorum.

honey you've gone too far 3

Tunic by Ossie Clark.

honey you've gone too far 4

Red chiffon blouse by John Craig.

honey you've gone too far 5

Ruffled black dress by Francis Ford.

honey you've gone too far 6

Low, plungey-neck dress in red satin by James Moncur.

honey you've gone too far 7

Black crepe sleeveless dress by Susan Barry.


Believe it or not, this is rainwear

believe it or not - burt glinn - the telegraph magazine - july 67 - 1

Showerproof cotton drill jodhpur suit by Biba. Fake snakeskin hat by Herbert Johnson. Black crocodile boots by Anello & Davide.

Since PVC, macs have been exotic… now the real exotics are turning waterproof. Weekend Telegraph photographed some of the unlikely new water-shedders in Jamaica, beside the Rio Grnde and in the Land of Look Behind.

Photographed by Burt Glinn.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from The Telegraph Magazine, July 1967.

believe it or not - burt glinn - the telegraph magazine - july 67

A PVC zip-up jumpsuit by Hilary Floyd modelled in Dunn’s River, Jamaica. Watch by Old England.

believe it or not - burt glinn - the telegraph magazine - july 67 - 2

Waterproof pigskin culottes by Cordoba Suedewear. Silk shirt by Annacat. Snakeskin waistcoat by Quorum.

believe it or not - burt glinn - the telegraph magazine - july 67 - 3

Hand knitted bikini by Spotlight. Trenchcoat by Weathergay.

believe it or not - burt glinn - the telegraph magazine - july 67 - 4

Showerproof cotton drill bermuda suit by Biba. Mock croc hat by Herbert Johnson.

believe it or not - burt glinn - the telegraph magazine - july 67 - 5

Canvas jacket by Andre Ledoux for Sidwall.

believe it or not - burt glinn - the telegraph magazine - july 67 - 6

Waterproof snakeskin brocade three-piece trouser suit by Susan Small. Crocodile Dior shoes by Charles Jourdan.

believe it or not - burt glinn - the telegraph magazine - july 67 - 7

Terylene and cotton cloak and hood by Burberrys. Tricel jersey evening dress and scarf by John Bates for Jean Varon.


Double Take

double-take-2

Beautiful Tree with the mysterious Mexican Datura lily, right. Black panne velvet suit with great gathered Edwardian sleeves, a cowl and long panelled skirt; to order from Ossie Clark at Quorum.

Cecil Beaton took pictures of Penelope Tree wearing new Ossie Clarks in his Wiltshire winter garden and David Bailey filmed them both, below. Double take—like a scene from the film with Cecil Beaton as the star that David Bailey is making and everyone can see in colour on ATV early next year. When I Die I Want to Go to Vogue was Bailey’s idea of a title: nobody agreed with this. For one thing it would only reflect one aspect of the Beaton legend writer, of more than twenty books; painter, with at least five major exhibitions; designer, of just about everything—opera, ballet, theatre, film—and one-man commentator, whose eye has always focused unerringly, and wittily, on the moment—this moment.

“An epic with a cast of thousands,” says Bailey about the film. There’s Mick Jagger, Jean Shrimpton, Lord David Cecil, Nureyev, Twiggy and many, including Sir Frederick Ashton, Dr Roy Strong, Sir George and Lady Weidenfeld, David Hockney, Patrick Procktor, Ossie Clark, Celia Birtwell, Mrs Anne Fleming, Lord and Lady Harewood, Lady Antonia Fraser and Edna O’Brien, who came to the now famous party that Cecil Beaton gave, and David Bailey filmed, in his London house. “I told everyone beforehand that there would be cameras and told them not to come if they minded. Nobody did mind.” “The worst moments,” says a guest, were when you knew the cameras were not on you.” And Beaton added, It was a mixture of people all looking very interesting in their new autumn clothes. Many looked beautiful.” Beautiful Tree with the mysterious Mexican Datura lily, right. Black panne velvet suit with great gathered Edwardian sleeves, a cowl and long panelled skirt; to order. Black crepe dress, side-buttoning collar, then split, long split skirt with pleated panel, 17 gns. Both at Quorum. Victorian silver choker, Sarah Dwyer and Tony Giorgi, The Chelsea Antique Market. Hair by Celine of Leonard.

Above photographed by Cecil Beaton. Below photographed by David Bailey.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, December 1970.

double-take-1

Black crepe dress, side-buttoning collar, then split, long split skirt with pleated panel, 17 gns. Ossie Clark at Quorum.


The Grand Affair

Grand affairs call for grand clothes, and provide a welcome opportunity to get out of our peasant blouses and jeans and dress accordingly. The nicest thing about fashion at the moment is that everyone is so confused as to what they should be wearing, that you can wear exactly what you like. We opt for the romantic Garbo fashion, tarted up in the ’71 style, because girls are beginning to look like girls again and, although we sympathise with Women’s Lib., we don’t believe you have to look like a fella to get equal rights!

Possibly the most perfect encapsulation of the Seventies-does-Thirties aesthetic, this homage to Art Deco features some of the most lust-worthy clothes from my favourite designers and boutiques. Including Biba, Ossie Clark and some rare Antony Price for Stirling Cooper!

Photographed in the home of interior designer Graeme Gibson rather than in a studio, the authenticity is heightened by the location and the props, and then finished with the sweet illustrated photoframes.

Photographed by David Tack.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, January 1971.

grand affair 3

Crepe dress by Antony Price for Stirling Cooper. T-strap shoes from Sacha.


Inspirational Images: Sheer Geniuses

ossie bailey vogue july 74 a

“What are Vidal Sassoon, Barbara Daly and Ossie Clark doing in Vogue studios? Vidal did the hair, Barbara the make-up, Ossie designed the dress … Lipstick matched to the flowers in Celia Birtwell’s printed chiffon. Ossie Clark twined his own gold chain and lizard over the shoulder and, snap, David Bailey. Dress to order from Ossie Clark.”

Photographed by David Bailey.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, July 1974

ossie bailey vogue july 74 b


Inspirational Editorials: Weekend Leave

She: Felt hat by Edward Mann. Pink sweater and matching cardigan by Ossie Clark for Radley. Skirt by Danielle Claire. Scarf from Essenses. He: Army sweater from Laurence Corner. Cord jodhpurs from Badges and Equipment.

She: Felt hat by Edward Mann. Pink sweater and matching cardigan by Ossie Clark for Radley. Skirt by Danielle Claire. Scarf from Essenses. He: Army sweater from Laurence Corner. Cord jodhpurs from Badges and Equipment.

Featuring the beautiful Pat Cleveland…

Photographed by Pelito Galvez.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, September 1975

She: Red beret by Kangol. White blouse with red velvet ribbon tie by Sheridan Barnett at Quorum. Grey fleck suit by Strawberry Studio. Snakeskin strappy shoes by Sacha. Scarf from Essenses. He: Army jacket and trousers from Laurence Corner. Boots from Badges and Equipment.

She: Red beret by Kangol. White blouse with red velvet ribbon tie by Sheridan Barnett at Quorum. Grey fleck suit by Strawberry Studio. Snakeskin strappy shoes by Sacha. Scarf from Essenses. He: Army jacket and trousers from Laurence Corner. Boots from Badges and Equipment.

She: Hat, sweater and scarf all by Lionel Fisher. Skirt by Danielle Claire. Shoes by Mary Graeme. He: Cream and black pin stripe shirt by Nostalgia. Jodhpurs and boots from Badges and Equipment.

She: Hat, sweater and scarf all by Lionel Fisher. Skirt by Danielle Claire. Shoes by Mary Graeme. He: Cream and black pin stripe shirt by Nostalgia. Jodhpurs and boots from Badges and Equipment.

She: Black felt hat by Charles Batten. Black skirt and cream coat both by Sheridan Barnett at Quorum. Black suede shoes by Russell and Bromley. Clutch bag from Boots. Black scarfr from BHS. He: Army jacket and trousers from Laurence Corner. Boots and kit bag from Badges and Equipment

She: Black felt hat by Charles Batten. Black skirt and cream coat both by Sheridan Barnett at Quorum. Black suede shoes by Russell and Bromley. Clutch bag from Boots. Black scarf from BHS. He: Army jacket and trousers from Laurence Corner. Boots and kit bag from Badges and Equipment


Inspirational Editorials: Maybe I was just born liberated

celestia sporborg by frank horvat vanity fair 1971 6

Stirling Cooper

This photoshoot, featuring the brilliantly named Celestia Sporborg, is another one of my all-time favourites, and one I have put off scanning for a long while because Vanity Fair is actually a rather painful magazine to scan. The gummed spine, with age, does not enjoy being flattened so it requires extra effort to maintain some kind of structural integrity. I couldn’t NOT scan though. I love these images. I love the blurriness, her natural facial expressions, the very domestic backdrop and, of course, the completely mind-blowingly fabulous clothes. I don’t know where to start. That Stirling Cooper above is just so modern. And the Radley playsuit, so very Glam. And the Ossie… Plus Alice Pollock, Foale and Tuffin and a Ritva sweater I sold on Vintage-a-Peel a few years back

It also identifies the shots from Vanity Fair’s Guide to Modern Etiquette, ‘Nice Girls Do’, which I posted about before. To contextualise this shoot, the entire June issue is dedicated to feminism and liberation. Certainly one of the main reasons I love Vanity Fair almost above all other magazines of the period is the fact that they would theme all the contents of an issue, including the fashion spreads.

Celestia Sporborg is now a casting director herself, with over a hundred film credits on IMDB. She married theatre and film producer Robert Fox (brother of James and Edward) in 1975 and they had three children together.

Photographed by Frank Horvat.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, June 1971

celestia sporborg by frank horvat vanity fair 1971 3

Foale & Tuffin

celestia sporborg by frank horvat vanity fair 1971 4

Radley

celestia sporborg by frank horvat vanity fair 1971 5

Ossie Clark

celestia sporborg by frank horvat vanity fair 1971 1

Ritva

celestia sporborg by frank horvat vanity fair 1971 2

Alice Pollock