Ingrid Boulting in Emcar

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Think of the simple little suit, the kind that’s made up of swing skirt, sporty jacket, silk shirt, and you think of Emcar. Colours are fresh, always of the moment, fabrics the nicest to wear – flannels, smooth worsteds, good tweeds, crisp cottons. Each piece of each look is well cut, simply detailed. The total effect relaxed and happy, all together but naturally so. This is Emcar’s famous versatile coordinating idea – mix and match looks that you buy as a whole or collect piece by piece. Now they’ve added a new dimension to their collection – pretty and feminine special occasion dresses designed by their young new designer Kathy Welch. Her ides range from creamy lace dresses with matching trousers, to Liberty print part looks like the one here, from satin kimono jackets with bra top an baggy trousers to beautifully sleeved dresses – some smooth lined and silky with bouffant sleeves, others gathered and off the shoulder in Liberty prints, with puff sleeve and swirling deep hems.

Photographed by David Bailey.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, March 1973.

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What’s new Alleycat?

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It was this close-cropped straw-white head munching a hamburger that stopped Paul Young, Mr Escalade, in his tracks. Within minutes, Suze was the first London fan of Betsey Johnson, young American designer for Alleycat & Co, and pretty hot news herself. Betsey’s clothes were fresh out of the packing cases, en route to her own special department in Escalade, packed with sensational shapes like these … moving proof that Betsey Johnson knows all about shape. Welcome to London, Betsey.

All clothes by Betsey Johnson for Alleycat & Co.

Photographed by Lieberson.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, December 1971.

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Twiggy’s New Mood

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Kaftan dress by Twiggy Dresses

Twiggy’s clothes change with her mood, something reflected noticeably in her Christmas wardrobe which includes beautiful ankle-length dresses in exotic prints and romantic styles in lovely colours. “I really have no particular look that I stick to,’ she confessed. ‘Yesterday I wore an ankle-length dress and today I have on a short one. I buy second-hand clothes if I think the fabrics and prints are beautiful. My wardrobe is really a complete mixture of things. I think that these days people can wear just what they like. There are really no set rules, and I personally feel that that’s very nice.”

During the last two months, Twiggy’s face, once constantly seen in virtually every magazine in the world, has been noticeably absent. “I have almost completely stopped modelling. Although I enjoyed every minute while I was doing it, I’m rather tired of it now. At the moment Justin and I will be working for only one American magazine and one Italian and any other work we want to do. Justin has sold the flat that he had, and is now living in the studio.”

Apart from Twiggy Enterprises in England, they have many business interests in the States selling all sorts of ‘Twiggy’ merchandise. During a visit there, earlier this year, Twiggy made a singing and dancing commercial for American TV which was an enormous success. Her main ambition for the coming year is to make a feature film which Justin will possibly co-produce.

`We almost made a film about eighteen months ago,” explained Justin. ‘Paul McCartney was going to write the music and Ken Russell direct. Then we had enormous trouble with the film rights and eventually had to drop the whole idea. When Twiggy made the American commercial she was so great, and en-joyed making it so much that it got us interested all over again. We’ve talked to various people about ideas for a script, but I can’t tell you anything definite about the story at the moment.”

Twiggy today is very different from the Twiggy of three years ago. She is more beautiful and her hair is longer. “I am desperately trying to grow it,” she says. “I want it to be very, very long.” She has grown up, but her unspoilt personality remains the same. One change Twiggy is very pleased about—she has stopped biting her fingernails. “All of a sudden I noticed that I’d just stopped —and that was that.”

She has a marvellous sense of humour and is interested in a variety of things. She loves reading, especially romantic novels, cinema and theatre, with a bent towards musicals, and pop music; she is a firm fan of the Beatles. She enjoys knitting. “I knit things all the time, for myself and all my friends.” (“Not bad, is she,” said Justin, sporting an original Twiggy knit.) “And I’ve just bought a crochet hook and book of instructions. You don t know how to crochet flowers, do you? It only tells you how to make circles in my book.”

Twiggy moves with the grace of a modern day Garbo. “As narrow as an arrow and as fetching as an etching” is a very apt description. She eats what she wants, is peeved that she can’t put on weight. “I wish I could,” she murmurs, busily demolishing an apricot pie. Another pet peeve of hers is spiders. “I hate spiders. I never kill them, though.”

What does Twiggy want this Christmas? “I don’t know. There’s nothing I really want. Just to be happy. And to make the film next year, that’ll be satisfying.”

Frizzy hairpieces by Joseph at Salon 33.

Photographs by Justin de Villeneuve.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, December 1969.

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Black crepe dress with sequins by Twiggy Dresses.

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Long printed dress by Twiggy Dresses.

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Short blue dress by Twiggy Dresses. Long printed scarf from Emmerton and Lambert.

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Long patchwork print dress by Twiggy Dresses.


Double Take

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Beautiful Tree with the mysterious Mexican Datura lily, right. Black panne velvet suit with great gathered Edwardian sleeves, a cowl and long panelled skirt; to order from Ossie Clark at Quorum.

Cecil Beaton took pictures of Penelope Tree wearing new Ossie Clarks in his Wiltshire winter garden and David Bailey filmed them both, below. Double take—like a scene from the film with Cecil Beaton as the star that David Bailey is making and everyone can see in colour on ATV early next year. When I Die I Want to Go to Vogue was Bailey’s idea of a title: nobody agreed with this. For one thing it would only reflect one aspect of the Beaton legend writer, of more than twenty books; painter, with at least five major exhibitions; designer, of just about everything—opera, ballet, theatre, film—and one-man commentator, whose eye has always focused unerringly, and wittily, on the moment—this moment.

“An epic with a cast of thousands,” says Bailey about the film. There’s Mick Jagger, Jean Shrimpton, Lord David Cecil, Nureyev, Twiggy and many, including Sir Frederick Ashton, Dr Roy Strong, Sir George and Lady Weidenfeld, David Hockney, Patrick Procktor, Ossie Clark, Celia Birtwell, Mrs Anne Fleming, Lord and Lady Harewood, Lady Antonia Fraser and Edna O’Brien, who came to the now famous party that Cecil Beaton gave, and David Bailey filmed, in his London house. “I told everyone beforehand that there would be cameras and told them not to come if they minded. Nobody did mind.” “The worst moments,” says a guest, were when you knew the cameras were not on you.” And Beaton added, It was a mixture of people all looking very interesting in their new autumn clothes. Many looked beautiful.” Beautiful Tree with the mysterious Mexican Datura lily, right. Black panne velvet suit with great gathered Edwardian sleeves, a cowl and long panelled skirt; to order. Black crepe dress, side-buttoning collar, then split, long split skirt with pleated panel, 17 gns. Both at Quorum. Victorian silver choker, Sarah Dwyer and Tony Giorgi, The Chelsea Antique Market. Hair by Celine of Leonard.

Above photographed by Cecil Beaton. Below photographed by David Bailey.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, December 1970.

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Black crepe dress, side-buttoning collar, then split, long split skirt with pleated panel, 17 gns. Ossie Clark at Quorum.


Pretty Basics

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Ladylike white silk shirtdress by Salvador. Coffee coloured goatskin bag from Harrods. Pure silk lace jersey scarfed turban by Frederick Fox. White sunglasses by Oliver Goldsmith. Ivory heart and ivory and gold cross on chains by Ken Lane.

Photographed by Clive Arrowsmith.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers and Queen, February 1975.


The Winter Folk Look

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Left: Embroidered long skirt and embroidered Mexican shirt, both by Souk. John Craig shaggy wool waistcoat. Buckle Under Enterprises balaclava. Right: Long skirt by Souk. Biba gloves. Clobber blouse at Stop the Shop. Jasper kimono from Miss Selfridge.

Warm folkclothes for the part of you that needs freedom and a soft, beautiful way of dressing even through the cold months of winter. These are the long skirt, blouses and shawls to pick up in the markets, the pinnies and shaggy wool coats to take off the peg and lounge around in.

Fashion by Sue Hone. Photographed by Alain Walsh.

Scanned from Petticoat, 11th December 1971.

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Left: Clobber gingham skirt with frill. Calico pinny from Laura Ashley. Knit jacket by Crochetta for Knits and Leathers. Feathers hat. Play balls from Inca. Right: Clobber seersucker skirt with print. John Craig rib polo sweater. Calico pinny at Laura Ashley. Embroidered jacket and Hessian belts at Inca. Herbert Johnson mittens.


Double-Takes by Robyn Beeche

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Dress, worn by all models, by Prêt-à-Porter. Left: Tights by Mary Quant. Boots by Midas. Orange rope from Bazaar Shops. Sash by Strawberry Studio. Pouch by Midas. Centre: Pants by Prêt-à-Porter. Boots by Russell & Bromley. Rope and belt by Bazaar Shops. Woven belt from The Warehouse. Far right: Shirt by Fifth Avenue. Waistcoat by Casablanca. Petticoat by Strawberry Studio. Boots by Midas. Scarf by Cornelia James.

Ever been to a party in a not very exclusive dress and had that feeling that someone else is bound to be wearing the same thing? Or, maybe, you simply can’t afford more than one dress for the party season. Here are some smart ideas on how to ring the changes with just one number and be the belle of the ball every single time.

Photographed by Robyn Beeche.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, December 1976.

An early shoot by legendary Australian photographer Robyn Beeche, who would later make her name capturing the alternative scene in London in the early 1980s and who sadly died earlier this year. Beeche is largely known for her documentation of catwalk shows and Alternative Miss World events, as well as experimental portraiture, so it’s interesting to see a more conventional studio/fashion set-up from her at the beginning of her career.

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Shirt dress, worn by all models, by Jeff Banks. Far left: Tights by Mary Quant. Shoes by Dolcis. Net scarf from Nostalgia. Gold sash by Strawberry Studio. Fabric around head and worn as sash from John Lewis. Centre: Jeans by Made in Heaven. Shoes by Sacha. Sashes by Strawberry Studio. Purses from Mitsukiku. Right: Sweater by Simon. Boots by Midas. Belt from Bazaar Shops.