Happily Ever After

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White lawn dress printed with butterflies and flowers by Thea Porter. Straw hat by Buckle Under. Red wedge shoes by Kurt Geiger. Belt by Shape.

There’s a good reason why Vanity Fair is possibly my favourite magazine of this period. They were relatively conventional in the 1960s, and would ‘merge’ with Honey magazine around 1972, but in their death knells they were just about the most innovative magazine in the UK. Issues were often themed around ‘issues’, for example this one is entirely themed around break-ups and divorces (including a story on what a divorced man should wear when taking his kid out for the day).

Nor did they shy away from more expensive designer names, such as Thea Porter and Zandra Rhodes here, mixing them happily with the more affordable but still iconic boutique names like Stirling Cooper and Mr Freedom. Adding Foale and Tuffin, Pablo and Delia and Terry de Havilland into the mix for good measure, and all those stunning illustrations by Michael Foreman… this is one of my favourite editorials of all time.

Vanity Fair is also, frankly, a nightmare to scan because it falls apart at the binding with the lightest touch, which is why I don’t scan them as often. So enjoy the heaven of Harri Peccinotti’s work while I gently shuffle all the pages back into the magazine…

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Illustrations by Michael Foreman.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, April 1971.

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Long grey crepe dress patterned with purple, green and red birds by Shape. Pablo and Delia suede thong necklace. Blue suede shoes at Sacha.

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Beige suede skirt with applique shapes and matching shawl by Mary Quant. Necklace from Buckle Under. Beige suede boots by Guy Humphries.

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Blue and white feather printed chiffon dress by Zandra Rhodes.

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Left to right: Chiffon blouse and multi-coloured skirt by Foale and Tuffin. Painted rainbow shoes from Mr Freedom. Painted belt by Shape. // Cream and red jersey catsuit (top only showing) and banded red and cream skirt both from Stirling Cooper. Red shoes by Kurt Geiger. // Cream, yellow and red jersey dress by Stirling Cooper. Pull on hat by Janice Peskett. // Red cotton t-shirt by Erica Budd. Cream dungarees from Stirling Cooper. Red python sandals at Elliotts.

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Above: Mauve satin cotton pinafore dress and blouse by Gladrags. Right: Bottom half of Alistair Cowin calico trousers with green printing. Green and yellow shoes by Terry de Havilland. Far right: Black velvet dungarees with white satin applique heart from Mr Freedom. Chiffon blouse from Foale and Tuffin. Mauve canvas boots at Charles Jourdan.


Cheap and Lovely

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Calico blouse from Bus Stop. Gingham skirt by Angela of London Town. Flower brooch from Gear. Edward Mann hat. Mr Freedom sox.

It’s not only the birds that are going cheap this spring – fashion is too. For so many great new ideas and at such an early stage in the proceedings, they seem to be asking us to pay very little. So we can show you wear-every-day clothes at your price to our heart’s content.

Photographed by Jean Claude Volpeliere. Fashion by Sue Hone.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Petticoat, February 1972.

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Left: Check pleated skirt from Bus Stop. Tee by Harold Ingram. Van der Fransen scarf. Right: Dorothy Perkins check mini skirt and tee-shirt.

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Left: Dorothy Perkins brushed denim jeans and smock. Van der Fransen beads. Ravel suede shoes. Right: Dorothy Perkins cord jeans. Angela at London town floral blouse. Chenille bolero by Erica Budd. Silver watch from Biba. Beret by Edward Mann. Shoes by Sacha.

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Cheesecloth skirt and blouse from Bus Stop. Bermona hat. Ravel shoes.

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Red and navy motor car sweater by Janine at Girl shops. Red smock coat from Bus Stop. Red pants by Angela at London town. Ravel shirt. Edward Mann hat.

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Yellow print dress by Anji. Edward Mann felt hat with cherries.


Look ravishing, Italian style

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Clothes by Missoni. Butterflies and beads from The Purple Shop.

Ottavio and Rosita Missoni are to Italian knit as Gucci is to leather. Using inspiration from original an unexpected quarters – a piece of antique porcelain, a fragment of embroidery, a picture painted by someone they then employ in their factory and train to use their knitting machines – together they produce the most beautiful knits in ravishing colours, extraordinary patterns and perfect shapes.

Photographed by Barry Lategan.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, April 1971.

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Clothes by Missoni. Pendant from The Purple Shop. Shoes from K Shoes.

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Clothes by Missoni. Claret platforms by Charles Jourdan.

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Clothes by Missoni. Feather choker from The Purple Shop. Suede sandals by Pedro Garcia for Russell & Bromley.


What a catch!

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Lace-up leather shoes by Sacha

We threw in the line and fished out some of the best and most original shoes that are in the shops this spring. It may not be an ideal catch for a real angler, but then it depends what you’re fishing for, doesn’t it?

Photographed by Duc.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, April 1972.

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Baseball boot by Biba. Red leather with peeptoe by Sacha, Navy and white corresponding lace-up by Russell & Bromley, Vivid China blue peeptoe slingback by Sacha, Red leather peeptoe and green and yellow on front by Sacha, Navy blue peeptoe with ruched panel by Sacha, Red leather embossed with yellow spots by Sacha.


Twiggy’s New Mood

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Kaftan dress by Twiggy Dresses

Twiggy’s clothes change with her mood, something reflected noticeably in her Christmas wardrobe which includes beautiful ankle-length dresses in exotic prints and romantic styles in lovely colours. “I really have no particular look that I stick to,’ she confessed. ‘Yesterday I wore an ankle-length dress and today I have on a short one. I buy second-hand clothes if I think the fabrics and prints are beautiful. My wardrobe is really a complete mixture of things. I think that these days people can wear just what they like. There are really no set rules, and I personally feel that that’s very nice.”

During the last two months, Twiggy’s face, once constantly seen in virtually every magazine in the world, has been noticeably absent. “I have almost completely stopped modelling. Although I enjoyed every minute while I was doing it, I’m rather tired of it now. At the moment Justin and I will be working for only one American magazine and one Italian and any other work we want to do. Justin has sold the flat that he had, and is now living in the studio.”

Apart from Twiggy Enterprises in England, they have many business interests in the States selling all sorts of ‘Twiggy’ merchandise. During a visit there, earlier this year, Twiggy made a singing and dancing commercial for American TV which was an enormous success. Her main ambition for the coming year is to make a feature film which Justin will possibly co-produce.

`We almost made a film about eighteen months ago,” explained Justin. ‘Paul McCartney was going to write the music and Ken Russell direct. Then we had enormous trouble with the film rights and eventually had to drop the whole idea. When Twiggy made the American commercial she was so great, and en-joyed making it so much that it got us interested all over again. We’ve talked to various people about ideas for a script, but I can’t tell you anything definite about the story at the moment.”

Twiggy today is very different from the Twiggy of three years ago. She is more beautiful and her hair is longer. “I am desperately trying to grow it,” she says. “I want it to be very, very long.” She has grown up, but her unspoilt personality remains the same. One change Twiggy is very pleased about—she has stopped biting her fingernails. “All of a sudden I noticed that I’d just stopped —and that was that.”

She has a marvellous sense of humour and is interested in a variety of things. She loves reading, especially romantic novels, cinema and theatre, with a bent towards musicals, and pop music; she is a firm fan of the Beatles. She enjoys knitting. “I knit things all the time, for myself and all my friends.” (“Not bad, is she,” said Justin, sporting an original Twiggy knit.) “And I’ve just bought a crochet hook and book of instructions. You don t know how to crochet flowers, do you? It only tells you how to make circles in my book.”

Twiggy moves with the grace of a modern day Garbo. “As narrow as an arrow and as fetching as an etching” is a very apt description. She eats what she wants, is peeved that she can’t put on weight. “I wish I could,” she murmurs, busily demolishing an apricot pie. Another pet peeve of hers is spiders. “I hate spiders. I never kill them, though.”

What does Twiggy want this Christmas? “I don’t know. There’s nothing I really want. Just to be happy. And to make the film next year, that’ll be satisfying.”

Frizzy hairpieces by Joseph at Salon 33.

Photographs by Justin de Villeneuve.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, December 1969.

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Black crepe dress with sequins by Twiggy Dresses.

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Long printed dress by Twiggy Dresses.

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Short blue dress by Twiggy Dresses. Long printed scarf from Emmerton and Lambert.

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Long patchwork print dress by Twiggy Dresses.


Haven’t got a thing to wear…

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The leopard cannot change his spots, And that’s the fix I’m in, So come an sit by me, my love, For some highly original skin. <<<<<<>>>>>> Fake-fur bikini and bangles from Biba. Boots by The Chelsea Cobbler.

Don’t give up – this could be the year when what goes on underneath could be your major investment.

Another extraordinary example of James Wedge’s wonderful work in the art of hand-tinting and further adventures in the world of Seventies-does-Fifties-pin up. Notable for including shoes and a petticoat from ‘Let It Rock’ which was Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood’s first shop in the Kings Road. The influence of rock and roll on and crossover between both glam rock and punk is perfectly encapsulated in this editorial, right slap bang in the middle of the Seventies.

Fashion by Liz Smith. Photographs by James Wedge.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Cosmopolitan, January 1975.

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When I’m awakened from my slumber It does seem rather mean – It’s always the wrong number and never Steve McQueen. <<<<<<>>>>>> Satin bra and panties from Biba.

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Watch out for life’s banana skins, And wear your prettiest slip, So you can say to passing men “I did enjoy my trip”. <<<<<<>>>>>> Bra by Gossard. Petticoat and stilettos from Let It Rock.

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When I went in for Crufts with my doggy, I didn’t know how it would go, But it proves the importance of grooming – We’ve been voted the best in the show! <<<<<<>>>>>> Corselette by Janet Reger. Scarf from Femina Furs. Gloves and hat by Biba.

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A girl can’t have too many furs, They give her an inner glow. But when it omes to trapping them How fur should a nice girl go? <<<<<<>>>>>> Bra, panties and suspender belt from Fenwick. Cape by Femina Furs. Mules from The Chelsea Cobbler.

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If you watch the girls men watch, You’ll see, The girls they watch watch their weight like me. // Look me over closely, Tell me what you see. But if you kiss and tell, you rat, I’ll swear it wasn’t me. <<<<<<>>>>>> Essences camisole. Shoes by Terry de Havilland. Nightgown by Finewear. Shoes by Zapata.

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A birthday gift for me, my dear? Come in and close the door. I do like them sending my presents, With a man from Securicor. <<<<<<>>>>>> Nightie and pantie set from Dorothy Perkins.

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Men used to say I was forward, But I’ll tell you this, for a fact: Since I chose to look pure, and a little demure, I simply haven’t looked back. <<<<<<>>>>>> Abecita body stocking. Negligee by Martin Emprex. Glove and bag from Biba. Shoes by Let It Rock.


Easy Does It

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Sweater and matching knickerbockers hand-knitted by Molly Dove.

Knitted tops for all occasions. Warm, comfortable sweaters with amusing motifs from The Sweet Shop, and samples from an imaginative collection by a new designer, Molly Dove. Her clothes are obtainable by mail order only; which, as well as keeping the prices down, makes them available to more of you! We also show a pretty little halter-necked top that’s barely there, just in case the sun comes out!

Photographed by John Bishop.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, January 1971.

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Canary yellow jumper by Eric Budd.

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Animal motif sweaters from The Sweet Shop.

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Knitted halter neck by Erica Budd.

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Piano key sweater by Anne Cossins for Mr Freedom.

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Random knit playsuit by Zeekit by Crochetta. Hand-knitted striped stockings from Women’s Home Industries.

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Bahamas and Birds sweaters both by Molly Dove.

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Sweater by Erica Budd. Bermudas by Donald Davies. Striped stockings by Women’s Home Industies.