Sisters, sisters…

Judy and Sally Geeson


…never were there such devoted sisters…. I only have brothers so I can’t even imagine what it must be like to have a sister. I always wanted one when I was younger, mainly because my brothers seemed like a pain in the backside a lot of the time (as I’m sure I was to them). Although I love them both dearly, they always had each other and I felt deprived of such a partner in crime. But I guess I’ve also benefitted from never having that kind of competitiveness. This post is pretty much just an excuse to post pictures of a few glamorous famous sisters…

Catherine Deneuve and Françoise Dorléac

Lynn and Vanessa Redgrave

Loretta Young, Sally Blane and Polly Ann Young

Patricia and Rosanna Arquette

Lynn and Vanessa Redgrave

Loretta Young and Sally Blane

Jackie and Joan Collins

Catherine Deneuve and Françoise Dorléac

Jenny and Pattie Boyd

Lillian and Dorothy Gish

Olivia De Havilland and Joan Fontaine

Joan and Jackie Collins

Jenny and Pattie Boyd

Joan Fontaine and Olivia De Havilland
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Weekend Inspirations: Thinking of springtime…
















Inspirations

Down with lurgies and stress! Boo, and may I say, hiss. I haven’t felt much like posting here, or anywhere. I’m lining up some listings when I’m able though, and they should be up and running next week I hope. Until then, or until I have the energy to post properly again, here is a lovely, shiny post with lots of lovely inspirational images I’ve picked up here and there.














Build high for happiness

Much as I love big hair, sometimes it needs to be contained in an upwards direction. The Sixties saw some of the biggest, sleekest and most extravagant styles which took heavy inspiration from Victorian and Edwardian originals but with that new, more expressive modern sexuality.

It’s one of my biggest annoyances that women only really wear their hair in interesting up-dos for their wedding days. You should probably wear a hairstyle which is quintessentially ‘you’, not a style which you think you ought to wear. (My mum wore her hair down for her wedding, which would have been fairly unusual in the early Seventies, and I think she looks amazing for it. And very ‘her’, at the time.) If you are going to wear it up for your wedding, why not try wearing it up on an evening out? It doesn’t have to look WAG-sleek, think more along the Bardot-lines…

Of course many of these looks are so sleek and precisely pinned that you would definitely need assistance, but quite a few are not. And the best way to learn, is to practice. The most basic tips I could give would be to curl your hair first (straight hair is more slippery and curls give more volume and grip – and you need plenty of that!!!) and, until you’re more savvy, let the curls do most of the work for you. Keep it relatively messy until you’re used to how you like it pinned, placement on the head and where you need volume or loose hair. Then you can build up to more precise and extravagant works of art.

And keep looking at photos!!





















Just try not to get a crick in your neck when you’ve done a good job. It’s for other people to admire…

And my own feeble and basic attempt from a long time ago. It was so solid I drunkenly accidentally fell asleep and awoke the next morning to find it entirely in tact.


Big Hair

Big Hair

A celebration of big Sixties hair. Because, if you’re anything like me, Big Hair is the only hair you can possibly manage in summer humidity…

Big Hair
Big Hair
Big Hair
Big Hair
Big Hair
Big Hair
Big Hair

Big Hair

Big Hair
Big Hair

Big Hair

Big Hair
Big Hair
Big Hair
Big Hair
Big Hair
Big Hair
Big Hair
Big Hair
Big Hair
Big Hair


Fashion Icon: Françoise Dorléac

As promised, picture spam of the incroyable Françoise Dorléac. The photo above makes me want to break out the hair dye…


















Les demoiselles de Rochefort

I really do love Lovefilm. Watched Les Demoiselles de Rochefort avec Monsieur M l’autre weekend, and instantly fell for the beautiful Françoise Dorléac. I knew (very vaguely) that she had died young, but reading up on it is so horribly sad.

Her premature death, aged 25, in a car crash outside Nice in 1967 (not long after completing Les Demoiselles) prevented Françoise from attaining the international recognition which would, eventually, come so easily to her younger sister Catherine Deneuve. She was as great a beauty and as talented an actress. I must see more!

Les Demoiselles… is a lovely, fanciful film by Jacques Demy about twin sisters who seek fame and love in Paris, if only they can leave Rochefort. Musical numbers abound, none of them overwhelmingly memorable, but enjoyable nonetheless. There’s even Gene Kelly! It’s got that sorbet Sixties feel, similar to something like Summer Holiday, which feels rather outdated for 1967 but seems to work within the deliciously strange world of the film.

I also rather enjoyed the clear referencing of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, a clip of which I have placed at the bottom of the post. Enjoy!

I will do a proper picture spam of Françoise later…