One Jump Ahead

Petticoat JSP a

Be an exhibitionist. Entwine yourself with yards of machine-age screen printed scarf by Sylvia Ayton and Zandra Rhodes.

Why wait; be bold, be brave, stay cool! Now – before all the sheep latch onto the look for ’69. Ignore us if you like, but if we’re right (and we think we are) you could be way ahead of the crowd.

Janet Street-Porter modelling clothes by the immensely brilliant combination of Sylvia Ayton and Zandra Rhodes, whose short-lived Fulham Road Clothes Shop is one of the rarest and grooviest boutique labels.

Photographed by Tim Street-Porter.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Petticoat, January 1969.

Petticoat JSP b

BE BOLD. Prints in 1969 owe nothing to the thirties; they look ahead, shout out bright new images and colours. Screen printed blouse by Sylvia Ayton and Zandra Rhodes.

Petticoat JSP c

BE BRAVE. Dare to wear the most sensational raincoat we’ve seen for ages. Why wear mini coats when your knees are freezing and soggy. Plastivamp black PVC and snakeskin printed PVC raincoat by Sylvia Ayton and Zandra Rhodes.

Petticoat JSP d

BE BRIGHT. Last year’s after-dark shiners are this spring’s day-time gleamers; pinky orange tricel jersey shirt dress with full sleeves by Simon Massey. Shoes by Lilley & Skinner.

Petticoat JSP e

BE COOL. The new fabric cut the new way; clinging Tricel jersey frock with a neckline that mum would remember. Navy and white checked dress by Simon Massey.

Petticoat JSP f

BE BRASH. Vulgar colours are carefully teamed and tastefully cut. Action-packed tweed trousers (with high fitted waistband and turn ups) together with waitsed and flared matching coat by Sylvia Ayton and Zandra Rhodes.

Petticoat JSP g

BE WITTY. Dare to laugh at yourself a little; see the funny side of fashion as well s the serious. Mint green courtelle jersey dress with handy pockets for sweeties, by Travers Tempos.

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Inspirational Interiors: Music in the black-out

Yvonne and Alan Harmon's completely contemporay black flocked music rom, lying extraordinarily at the heart of a traditional antique furnished house. The designer, Royston Fulljames, used new American speakers, Bang & Olufsen turntable. There are push button black blinds and lights to glash on dim, a round Keracolour television, flocked black too, and three big, comfortable, black leather chairs from Harrods. The Perspex sculpture with flashing lights, by S.P. White, from Presents of Sloane St; it's all very much in tune.

Yvonne and Alan Harmon’s completely contemporay black flocked music room, lying extraordinarily at the heart of a traditional antique furnished house. The designer, Royston Fulljames, used new American speakers, Bang & Olufsen turntable. There are push button black blinds and lights to flash on dim, a round Keracolour television, flocked black too, and three big, comfortable, black leather chairs from Harrods. The Perspex sculpture with flashing lights, by S.P. White, from Presents of Sloane St; it’s all very much in tune.

Photographed by Tim Street-Porter.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, November 1972


Inspirational Interiors: Flocked Fantasy

christopher ward and fanny brown tim street-porter  vogue august 71

Christopher Ward , Daily Mirror writer, and Fanny Brown, model, inside a magically flocked flat. Sweet dreams jet trail across the bedroom ceiling, the living-room has tall forest glade, fuzzy fruit marquetry, low mirror pond, a mossy green bank to hold stereo and grow plastic mushrooms while you lean back and watch the painted dawn. All flocking by Stan Peskett.

Photographed by Tim Street-Porter. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, August 1971


Inspirational Images: Party Stuff

"19's Guide to Entertaining"

“19’s Guide to Entertaining”

Photographed by Tim Street-Porter. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19, April 1969


Vintage Interiors: Thea Porter, Ricci Burns and Antony Redmile

Photographed by Tim Street-Porter. Shimmering dress, cap and necklace at Biba.

Needless to say, I desire all of these interiors but particularly Thea’s incredible mirrored dining room. Phwoar. And yes, it is also another insight into the mysterious Mr Antony Redmile – who we have met before

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Cosmopolitan, December 1974


Cosmo Gets Delayed at the Office

Photographed by Tim Street-Porter. Scanned from Cosmopolitan, February 1973.

Still slowly settling into my lovely studio space; trying to avoid the pitfalls of the ‘I must fill it up, it must look exactly how I want it to immediately‘ mentality, to which I know I am vulnerable. Slowly, but surely. My beloved Lloyd Loom table and chair are out of storage and awaiting a respray from their slightly grotty boudoir pink to… I don’t know yet.

I am on a promise for an original ladderax bureau unit, inherited indirectly from my grandparents, to store my reference books, magazines and paperwork. The framed pictures are stacking up in the corners, waiting for locations. The last thing I want is for it to feel like an office. I want it to feel like a creative, comfortable studio space. I discovered a long time ago, whilst temping, that a ‘trad’ office environment is really, really not for me.

So while I am developing things slowly, I am also taking inspiration from this fantastic Cosmopolitan feature on businesswomen and their office spaces. The chaos of Diane Logan’s millinery studio is probably closest to my natural style:

“You have to create a look like this out of rubbish*. It doesn’t just arrive.”

But there is plenty to admire and covet in all three.

*I don’t approve of the word ‘rubbish’, but I approve of her sentiment.

Scanned from Cosmopolitan, February 1973.