Act Naturally

Act Naturally 1

Yellow cheesecloth blouse and matching shirt by Richard Green.

For those lazy, hazy days of summer, nothing is better to hang out in than loose, casual, breezy blouses and skirts. There are masses around to choose from and it seems that the smock top has really gathered strength this summer. Why not? It’s the best kind of top to feel really relaxed and liberated in. Wear it over old jeans, if you’re really the casual type, or over skirts down to ground level. One of the best and most comfortable buys to go with the look is soft cotton espadrilles, with rope soles, like the ones from Bata.

Photographed by David Anthony. Model: Charlotte Martin.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, July 1972.

Act Naturally 2

Green and white gingham blouse and matching long skirt and pinny, all by Spectrum.

Act Naturally 3

Gingham smock and matching skirt (not shown) by David Silverman. Jeans model’s own.

Act Naturally 4

T-shirt from selection at Biba. Smock top in crepe de chine and matching long skirt both by Madrugada. Red tights by Biba. Yellow espadrilles by Bata.

Act Naturally 5

White smock in fine wool by Jenny Hare.

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The Varnished and the Unvarnished

the-varnished-and-the-unvarnished

This picture isn’t a ludicrous flight of fancy. Those nails belong to Bonnie, a girl who really does scrabble about under the bonnet of her car checking oil, batteries and spark plug. She also shoes the odd bit of typing and her fair share of washing up, plug changing and picture hanging.

But maybe we have been a little unfair. Bonnie is not only one of our favourite make-up artists (working for Elizabeth Arden) but she’s a fully trained manicurist too.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Honey, May 1973.


Inspirational Images: The Secret of Being an Inscrutable Beauty

Julie Ege in Thea Porter

Inscrutable means being “wholly mysterious” and after a summer of freckles and jeans maybe the time is ripe for the return of the cool, self-regarding beauty. Julie Ege, Queen of a thousand popping flash bulbs, without whom no première is complete, veils her flashing smile to emerge as the epitome of the new inscrutable woman, in our picture.

Dress by Thea Porter. Necklaces from the Purple Shop. Bracelets and rings from Jones, Beauchamp Place. Fur rug from Harrods. Make up by Pierre LaRoche for Estée Lauder. Hair by Oliver at Leonard.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Cosmopolitan, September 1973.

Apologies for the protracted absence! I am most definitely back, working on new blogs for both here and Shrimpton Couture Curate, and of course I’m still sourcing the best boutique vintage for you over at Vintage-a-Peel! xx


Inspirational Images: Eyebrows – Going, going, gone

eyebrows harpers and queen december 1970 david anthony

The no-eyebrow look for the Seventies. You can achieve it, as we did here, by the use of a hair removing cream — I advise against plucking or waxing as this can permanently inhibit regrowth. Or, if you don’t want to be so drastic, you can have your brows bleached so that they are almost invisible. For the pale complexion : English Porcelain Re-Nutriv foundation with Sheer Bisque Re-Nutriv face powder; Neutraled Flesh Under Eye Primer stick ; Aurora Pink and Mint Haze Colour Contour for shaping and shading. For the eyes we used Plum Raisin and Candlelight Pink Pressed Eyelid shadows, and Black Burgundy Lash Lengthening Roll-On mascara. The lipstick is Mulberry See-Through. All by Estee Lauder. Hair style : a Marcel wave brought up to date, by Ricci Burns.

My prediction for 1971 is a swing away from the natural look and the form I believe it will take is the disappearance of eyebrows and the return to a pale, pink and white complexion. As with so many new looks in the past few years, this one has been started by models. I saw two of them, browless, this autumn in St Tropez and it gave a new and exciting perspective to the face. Beauty, like fashion, goes in cycles : after a decade of the natural look, we are due for a return to a more stylised face. The last time this occurred was in the Twenties when women achieved a very stylised type of look with pale faces, dark lips, and eyebrows plucked into pin-thin crescents. It reached its peak in the faces of Garbo, Jean Harlow and Marlene Dietrich. If, this time, it is the no-eyebrow look that catches on, it will not be the first time that brows have been removed in the cause of beauty : fashionable ladies in the 15th century covered their faces with white flour powder and accentuated the egg shape pallor of their complexions by plucking the eyebrows out completely and scraping back their hair under exaggerated head-dresses.

Beauty by Joan Price. Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers and Queen, December 1970


Inspirational Editorials: Two-Way Switch

Square necked sideless dress by Ginger Group. Gold link belt by Paris House. Black patent shoes by Kurt Geiger. Satin beret by Rudolf.

Square necked sideless dress by Ginger Group. Gold link belt by Paris House. Black patent shoes by Kurt Geiger. Satin beret by Rudolf.

Try a touch of seasonal sorcery – swop clothes with yourself instead of with your sister or friend. Mix tweed with satin, sweaters with fur; play addition and subtraction with your wardrobe to achieve subtle solutions for every climate, every occasion and every mood.

Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Queen, December 1967

Square necked sideless dress by Ginger Group. White blouse by Eric Hart. Tortoiseshell and gilt link belt by Dior. Brown shoes by Kurt Geiger. Brown knitted beret at Fenwick.

Square necked sideless dress by Ginger Group. White blouse by Eric Hart. Tortoiseshell and gilt link belt by Dior. Brown shoes by Kurt Geiger. Brown knitted beret at Fenwick.

Oxford bags by Gerald McCann in Donegal tweed with detatchable black satin turn-ups. Black satin shirt by Eric Hart. Black patent belt by Mary Quant. Black patent shoes by Kurt Geiger.

Oxford bags by Gerald McCann in Donegal tweed with detatchable black satin turn-ups. Black satin shirt by Eric Hart. Black patent belt by Mary Quant. Black patent shoes by Kurt Geiger.

Oxford bags by Gerald McCann in Donegal tweed with detatchable black satin turn-ups. Brown and tweed long belted sweater from Browns. Antique Baltic amber beads from Sac Freres. Knitted brown beret at Fenwick. Beige and black ankle boots by Ravel.

Oxford bags by Gerald McCann in Donegal tweed with detatchable black satin turn-ups. Brown and tweed long belted sweater from Browns. Antique Baltic amber beads from Sac Freres. Knitted brown beret at Fenwick. Beige and black ankle boots by Ravel.

Short white fluffy kid coat by Calman Links, with white fox collar and white satin belt. Diamante drop earrings by Dior. Square diamante handbag by Susan Handbags. White grosgrain strap shoes by Russell and Bromley.

Short white fluffy kid coat by Calman Links, with white fox collar and white satin belt. Diamante drop earrings by Dior. Square diamante handbag by Susan Handbags. White grosgrain strap shoes by Russell and Bromley.

Short white fluffy kid coat by Calman Links, with white fox collar. Round-necked chocolate sweater by Laura Jamieson, with long sleeves, buttons down back, and matching ribbed skirt. Tortoiseshell and gilt belt by Dior. Stretch brown leather boots by Kurt Geiger.

Short white fluffy kid coat by Calman Links, with white fox collar. Round-necked chocolate sweater by Laura Jamieson, with long sleeves, buttons down back, and matching ribbed skirt. Tortoiseshell and gilt belt by Dior. Stretch brown leather boots by Kurt Geiger.

Black velvet trouser suit by Carrot on Wheels. Cream silk shirt by Annacat. Square snakeskin handbag by Russell and Bromley. Black patent shoes by Kurt Geiger. Black velvet hair bow by Dior.

Black velvet trouser suit by Carrot on Wheels. Cream silk shirt by Annacat. Square snakeskin handbag by Russell and Bromley. Black patent shoes by Kurt Geiger. Black velvet hair bow by Dior.

Black velvet trouser suit by Carrot on Wheels. Beige polo necked sweater by McCaul. Black belt with perspex buckle by Dior. Leather shoes by Charles Jourdan.

Black velvet trouser suit by Carrot on Wheels. Beige polo necked sweater by McCaul. Black belt with perspex buckle by Dior. Leather shoes by Charles Jourdan.


Inspirational Editorials: Party Line

Strapless dress in pure paper silk taffeta should turn every head just with its rustle. By Bob Schulz, £45 from Patsy B Boutique, 6 Upper Grosvenor Street, W1. Lightly boned bodice so you don't rely entirely on willpower!

Strapless dress in pure paper silk taffeta should turn every head just with its rustle. By Bob Schulz, £45 from Patsy B Boutique, 6 Upper Grosvenor Street, W1. Lightly boned bodice so you don’t rely entirely on willpower!

Photographed by David Anthony. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, April 1972.

The same again only different. Bob Schulz paper silk taffeta dress. Glamour like we haven't had it since Cyd Charisse - and thank God it's back. Lond dress made to order for grand party entrances.

The same again only different. Bob Schulz paper silk taffeta dress. Glamour like we haven’t had it since Cyd Charisse – and thank God it’s back. Long dress made to order for grand party entrances.