Happily Ever After

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White lawn dress printed with butterflies and flowers by Thea Porter. Straw hat by Buckle Under. Red wedge shoes by Kurt Geiger. Belt by Shape.

There’s a good reason why Vanity Fair is possibly my favourite magazine of this period. They were relatively conventional in the 1960s, and would ‘merge’ with Honey magazine around 1972, but in their death knells they were just about the most innovative magazine in the UK. Issues were often themed around ‘issues’, for example this one is entirely themed around break-ups and divorces (including a story on what a divorced man should wear when taking his kid out for the day).

Nor did they shy away from more expensive designer names, such as Thea Porter and Zandra Rhodes here, mixing them happily with the more affordable but still iconic boutique names like Stirling Cooper and Mr Freedom. Adding Foale and Tuffin, Pablo and Delia and Terry de Havilland into the mix for good measure, and all those stunning illustrations by Michael Foreman… this is one of my favourite editorials of all time.

Vanity Fair is also, frankly, a nightmare to scan because it falls apart at the binding with the lightest touch, which is why I don’t scan them as often. So enjoy the heaven of Harri Peccinotti’s work while I gently shuffle all the pages back into the magazine…

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Illustrations by Michael Foreman.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, April 1971.

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Long grey crepe dress patterned with purple, green and red birds by Shape. Pablo and Delia suede thong necklace. Blue suede shoes at Sacha.

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Beige suede skirt with applique shapes and matching shawl by Mary Quant. Necklace from Buckle Under. Beige suede boots by Guy Humphries.

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Blue and white feather printed chiffon dress by Zandra Rhodes.

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Left to right: Chiffon blouse and multi-coloured skirt by Foale and Tuffin. Painted rainbow shoes from Mr Freedom. Painted belt by Shape. // Cream and red jersey catsuit (top only showing) and banded red and cream skirt both from Stirling Cooper. Red shoes by Kurt Geiger. // Cream, yellow and red jersey dress by Stirling Cooper. Pull on hat by Janice Peskett. // Red cotton t-shirt by Erica Budd. Cream dungarees from Stirling Cooper. Red python sandals at Elliotts.

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Above: Mauve satin cotton pinafore dress and blouse by Gladrags. Right: Bottom half of Alistair Cowin calico trousers with green printing. Green and yellow shoes by Terry de Havilland. Far right: Black velvet dungarees with white satin applique heart from Mr Freedom. Chiffon blouse from Foale and Tuffin. Mauve canvas boots at Charles Jourdan.


Cheap and Lovely

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Calico blouse from Bus Stop. Gingham skirt by Angela of London Town. Flower brooch from Gear. Edward Mann hat. Mr Freedom sox.

It’s not only the birds that are going cheap this spring – fashion is too. For so many great new ideas and at such an early stage in the proceedings, they seem to be asking us to pay very little. So we can show you wear-every-day clothes at your price to our heart’s content.

Photographed by Jean Claude Volpeliere. Fashion by Sue Hone.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Petticoat, February 1972.

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Left: Check pleated skirt from Bus Stop. Tee by Harold Ingram. Van der Fransen scarf. Right: Dorothy Perkins check mini skirt and tee-shirt.

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Left: Dorothy Perkins brushed denim jeans and smock. Van der Fransen beads. Ravel suede shoes. Right: Dorothy Perkins cord jeans. Angela at London town floral blouse. Chenille bolero by Erica Budd. Silver watch from Biba. Beret by Edward Mann. Shoes by Sacha.

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Cheesecloth skirt and blouse from Bus Stop. Bermona hat. Ravel shoes.

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Red and navy motor car sweater by Janine at Girl shops. Red smock coat from Bus Stop. Red pants by Angela at London town. Ravel shirt. Edward Mann hat.

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Yellow print dress by Anji. Edward Mann felt hat with cherries.


Easy Does It

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Sweater and matching knickerbockers hand-knitted by Molly Dove.

Knitted tops for all occasions. Warm, comfortable sweaters with amusing motifs from The Sweet Shop, and samples from an imaginative collection by a new designer, Molly Dove. Her clothes are obtainable by mail order only; which, as well as keeping the prices down, makes them available to more of you! We also show a pretty little halter-necked top that’s barely there, just in case the sun comes out!

Photographed by John Bishop.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, January 1971.

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Canary yellow jumper by Eric Budd.

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Animal motif sweaters from The Sweet Shop.

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Knitted halter neck by Erica Budd.

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Piano key sweater by Anne Cossins for Mr Freedom.

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Random knit playsuit by Zeekit by Crochetta. Hand-knitted striped stockings from Women’s Home Industries.

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Bahamas and Birds sweaters both by Molly Dove.

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Sweater by Erica Budd. Bermudas by Donald Davies. Striped stockings by Women’s Home Industies.


Mr Freedom

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Navy blue t-shirt in cotton with dynamic POW stitched front by Mr Freedom, £4.

Photographed by Stuart Brown.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, December 1969.

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Black cotton t-shirt with a satin ZAP stitched on the front by Mr Freedom, £4. Green satin trousers by Ossie Clark for Quorum, approx 5 1/2 gns.

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T-shirts by Mr Freedom. Shorts by Jack Hobbs.

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All by Jack Hobbs.

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Bright red t-shirt overprinted with Tarzan riding a lion by Mr Freedom, 27s 6d. Green satin trousers by Ossie Clark for Quorum, approx 5 1/2 gns.

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Printed cotton Superman t-shirt by Mr Freedom. Shorts by Jack Hobbs.


All Dyed Up

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Velvet tie-dye dress from Mr Freedom. Canvas boots from Biba.

All sorts of things are getting the tie and dye treatment this summer – and we bet it will colour our autumn too! It’s easy to tie-dye jeans and t-shirts, just tie a knot anywhere, grab a packet of dye, and you’re away! But the experts have been getting at everything so you can buy it already dyed – summer colour has hit jersey, velvet and gaberdine to. So get dyeing!

Photographed by David Finch.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Petticoat, July 1970

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Tie-dye vest by Miss Impact. Satin tie-dye pants from Gordon King. Woolworth plimsolls. Bus Stop cloche. Belt from Consortium.

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Tie-dye vest from Miss Impact. Biba canvas boots. Lilac snakeskin belt from Bus Stop.

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Tie-dye pants and top by London Mob. Specs from Corocraft. Knee socks from Bus Stop. Plimsolls from Woolworths.

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Dress by Miss Impact. Socks from Bus Stop. Glasses from Biba. Plimsolls from Woolworths.

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Satin tie-dye suit by Gordon King. Biba specs. Sandals by Xanthe leather.


Wham, Pow, Splat: Mr Freedom in Rave magazine

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For crazy cartoon lovers, blue long sleeved tee-shirt with super leather motif of ‘Roger the Dodger’ sewn into the front, 4gns.. also available are many other comic characters. Red velvet trousers, £6 15s.

Hey, Supergirl! Are you a match for Superman? Or even Mickey Mouse? A girl can have too much of looking smart and neat – there comes a time when we all like to lounge around with a cute comic book and an even cuter guy. So get tuned in to this crazy clobber. And Captain Marvel will be yours for the asking…

Photographed by Chris Holland.

Fashion by Annette Grundy. Toys by Polypops.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Rave, December 1969

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Satin jacket with ‘Jack Flash’ motif on front and back. Also in black and red, 6gns.

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Beautiful calf-length blue crepe dress tied at the waist with the New York skyline around the hem, 11gns.

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For all Mockey Mouse fans a mauve crepe blouse with pleated front and satin Mickey Mouse motif on the back.


Fun To Live With: Jon Wealleans and Jane Hill

Plump and luxuriously cosy, quilted cushions, with

Plump and luxuriously cosy, quilted cushions, with “Thirties” motifs.

Incredible feature on legendary pop artist and architect Jon Wealleans and his textile designer wife Jane Hill who were heavily involved with the Mr Freedom shops and products.

Photographed by Tim Street-Porter.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, March 1971.

wealleans5Jon Weallans and Jane Hill are two ex-Royal College of Art students, both twenty-four. They were married in San Francisco six months ago, and they live and work in an Edwardian house in London’s Notting Hill Gate.

Both designers, Jane studied textile design at college, and Jon studied interior design; so, to put it simply, Jon designs the furniture, and Jane covers it. They don’t often work together but, whether working alone or together, both produce pretty off-beat stuff, as you can see from the photographs of their living-room.

Jane, who made the escalator blind, says her ideas come from magazines.

An unusual escalator roller blind, which has been silk-screen printed in red and black, on cotton.

An unusual escalator roller blind, which has been silk-screen printed in red and black, on cotton.

“I’ve just got a huge pile of visual references. Suddenly I see a picture of something and think, I could use that, and start drawing. I’ve always been interested in escalators, anyway – I have recurring dreams about them! The red flowing down these could be blood or it could be ketchup. It’s not really supposed to be morbid. There may be submerged sinister implications, but they weren’t deliberate.” (The blind is to be produced as a poster by Gallery Five.)

Jon’s answer to it is: “It’s all about making a very strange juxtaposition of two things. An escalator is an object you can identify with, and there’s suddenly a strange ooze coming out of it. It’s sinister, but afterwards you can look at escalators in a new way.”

Jane is also responsible for the cushions. She used ‘Thirties’ motifs and giant shoes; silk-screened on to satin, then quilted and made up into cushions. She commented: “I suppose in the ‘Thirties, people said, ‘Why on earth paint a piece of newspaper and a dead fish?’ And perhaps the artist replied: ‘Because people haven’t looked at an old newspaper and a dead fish before.’

“It’s important, because I think a decorative thing usually ends up being around for quite a long time, and I don’t very much like the idea of doing things which you can’t look at, and afterwards think: ‘Ali, I didn’t see it quite like that before.’ ”

“We’re both designers, and that’s all we’re good at,” confeses Jon. “We have no other perks, this is how we make our bread. The people I respect most are the people who have come to terms with the fact that they are making a living, and that they are not arty dilettantes. They are the people who are really on the ball, and who can get up and do a bit of graphic design on their knee, whilst eating beans on toast, or whilst watching television.

“What you need in all forms of art is a sense of humour. I can’t stand people who get all heavy, and take themselves that seriously, be-cause I don’t think anybody should think like this unless they are in a fantastically serious cause.”

Jon was commissioned to design the new Mr. Freedom shop in Ken-sington, London, and it is for this that he designed the false teeth chair. It is made of PVC covered foam, and has a fake fur tongue—a masterpiece of upholstering by Felicity Youett. (It’s sold by Mr. Freedom for £160.)

A false teeth sofa, with a soft and life-like tongue for some idle lounging.

A false teeth sofa, with a soft and life-like tongue for some idle lounging.

“The teeth may seem pretty funny,” he says, “but if you go and sit on the Underground in the rush hour and look at those people, they’re pretty funny. I mean, who’s the funniest? Maybe Mr. Freedom are the most honest funny people in Lon-don, because the people who wear their clothes look really happy. And, with my furniture, I’d like to give just a few people a bit of a buzz, by looking at it. I’d like them to think again.

“My ideas usually come in a functional way. I really did want a unit that could make up a bed, sofa or a room, which is what the jigsaw seats do.” (Each unit costs £30 from Mr. Freedom.) “It’s the most obvious thing really, because you can rearrange them to any shape. They are in candy-floss coloured, metallic PVC covered foam.

Intriguing foam-filled and interlocking jigsaw seats, can be pieced together or else used separately.

Intriguing foam-filled and interlocking jigsaw seats, can be pieced together or else used separately.

“The false teeth are a bit of a con, because they originally started out as a piece of pop, soft sculp-ture, and we only realised when we opened them, that you could make a seat. It is really a case of taking something perfectly normal and everyday, and blowing it up to giant proportions, so that people will look at it twice and think about the ordinary item again.

“It seems pointless to keep designing the same things. No one need ever design another chair; there are enough for the next fifty years, because there are guys around who have solved the problem completely. After a while, you get an optimum solution and I think Le Corbusier had the optimum solution for a chair in the ‘Thirties, so why carry on now doing Design Centre chain?”

The only furniture he didn’t design in their living-room, are the white plastic stacking chairs by Jo Colombo of Italy, which are sold in this country in Habitat, £11 each. The chrome dining chairs are sold at Habitat shops for £18 each. The floor is covered with white lino tiles, which you can buy in packets, and lay yourself.

They are working on their bedroom. A giant Orson Welles film-set bed, placed on fur-covered Busby Berkeley steps, is planned, and the room will be in navy, scarlet and silver. They are painting stars on the, ceiling and having a neon ‘hello’ sign on the wall. Jon’s designs are certainly different, but he’s not entirely devoted to the freaky. As he says, “I did the main branch of the Bank of England in Leeds, and they were the straightest people. You couldn’t get further away from Mr. Freedom if you tried.

“The acid test would be to do something like a home for the blind, because you couldn’t do anything visual, it would all have to be spot on, and really good. No colour, jokes or imagery. That would really sort out the sheep from the goats. Or if someone living in this road said, ‘Do my bedsitter for £10.’ Now that’s the sort of problem I’d really enjoy working on.”