Paint just took a trip

paint took a trip nov 71

Probably the greatest paint advert of all time, featuring model and singer Amanda Lear wearing clothes by Kansai Yamamoto from Boston-151. Shoes are by Zapata (aka Manolo Blahnik).

Scanned from Honey, November 1971

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Sock it to me Amanda Lear

Sock it to me! The Now Generation.

Miss Amanda Lear on the cover of a seriously swinging LP from 1968, found in Cullompton, Devon of all places. For so many reasons, I could not resist buying it… Not least that the Batman-style ‘SOCK’ is actually attached to her boxing glove and not superimposed on the photograph.


Happy St BryanGod Day

Yes, it’s that time of year again. St BryanGod Day. Never heard of it? Pah.

To celebrate, here are some favourite couplings. Some romantic, some creative, some fictitious…


Vintage Adverts: Amanda Lear in Triumph

I’ll take a Dorabelle T in Campari please!

I blogged about this advert ages ago, because she’s wearing a Jean Varon dress in the final picture. But at that point I didn’t recognise the model! How remiss of me. Scanned from Nova, November 1970, but I’m pretty sure it was an older advert than that.

 


Au revoir stinky old 2011. Happy New Lear!

As is now my tradition, for I really rather loathe the whole New Year ‘thing’ with a passion, I would like to wish you all a Happy New Lear with a mini-picture spam of new Amanda pictures I’ve seen this year. Several have been pilfered from the fabulous Mr Tarkus. Merci!



Duffy (finally)

Queen magazine, 1963

Although you’ll all have long since forgotten that I promised to review the fantastic Duffy book (published by ACC. RRP £45 but currently £31.98 on Amazon.co.uk), I certainly haven’t and it’s been rather weighing on my mind. In fact, I’m troubled by the fact that I rarely seem to have the energy to type long, rambling blog posts at all these days.

So, as I often do, I will largely leave the photographs to do the communicating. Which is rather the point of the book itself. It is not a weighty tome about the life of the man, rather it is a weighty tome about the talent of the man. The talent which made him world-famous, but eventually left him feeling so trapped he had to [pretty much literally] destroy it in order to escape it. Page after page of gorgeous women, swinging dudes of the highest and lowest order and generally Interesting People. But it also covers the later period, the advertising and the selling-out, or ‘prostitution’ as he honestly described it.

I have to admit, I’m always on the look out for new Duffy shoots in my magazines because I’m almost rather bored of seeing the same ones shown again and again. And to be fair, of course, in Duffy’s case there is the genuine problem with the complete lack of original source material. His son Chris has spent years reassembling the archive, and I have to respect the labour of love that this project has become. Thankfully, the book is more varied than the exhibition I attended earlier this year would lead you to believe. I have scanned a few of my personal favourites, which I hope will communicate the beauty of his work.

A pet hate must be noted at this point, which is that these books rarely identify the designer of the clothes worn in the pictures. I know it doesn’t seem like much to a non-clothes obsessive, but I want to know if that dress really was by so-and-so and I find it infuriating for such information to be left out when surely it must be known?

Obviously, luxuriously printed and sized books such as this require the highest calibre of image quality for reproduction purposes, but it would be nice, in a few years time, to see a book which features more obscurities, more magazine tear-sheets and clippings; covering the lesser-known styles and techniques he used. For there are many. I mean, David Bailey has had enough books about him to last a lifetime; Brian Duffy certainly deserves another one.

Definitely one for the Christmas list. And watch out, because I’m going to be reviewing more books to put on your Christmas list over the next few weeks. Yes indeed.

Amanda Lear, 1971

Sweet, 1970

Unidentified, 1960s

Jean Shrimpton, Vogue 1962

Average White Band album cover, 1979

Michael Sarne, 1962

Pirelli, 1965

Pierre La Roche, Aladdin Sane make-up artist, 1973

Alphasud Car, Henley on Thames, 1974

Mike Henry and Nancy Kovack, 1964


Si tu cherches la bagarre?

I’m finally off for a few days to spend my second Christmas and only New Year with someone special, so I won’t be around to blog. Thank you all so much for your comments over the past few days, and indeed the past year. I’ve been doing silly hours at work for a few weeks now, so I haven’t had time to comment as much as I would like on all of your blogs, so it means a lot to me.

Enjoy your New Year celebrations, as small or as huge as they may be. I suspect mine will involve a lot of champagne coupe action, so I’ll raise a glass to all my dear readers and fellow bloggers and say…

Happy New Lear! 😉