Happily Ever After

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White lawn dress printed with butterflies and flowers by Thea Porter. Straw hat by Buckle Under. Red wedge shoes by Kurt Geiger. Belt by Shape.

There’s a good reason why Vanity Fair is possibly my favourite magazine of this period. They were relatively conventional in the 1960s, and would ‘merge’ with Honey magazine around 1972, but in their death knells they were just about the most innovative magazine in the UK. Issues were often themed around ‘issues’, for example this one is entirely themed around break-ups and divorces (including a story on what a divorced man should wear when taking his kid out for the day).

Nor did they shy away from more expensive designer names, such as Thea Porter and Zandra Rhodes here, mixing them happily with the more affordable but still iconic boutique names like Stirling Cooper and Mr Freedom. Adding Foale and Tuffin, Pablo and Delia and Terry de Havilland into the mix for good measure, and all those stunning illustrations by Michael Foreman… this is one of my favourite editorials of all time.

Vanity Fair is also, frankly, a nightmare to scan because it falls apart at the binding with the lightest touch, which is why I don’t scan them as often. So enjoy the heaven of Harri Peccinotti’s work while I gently shuffle all the pages back into the magazine…

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Illustrations by Michael Foreman.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, April 1971.

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Long grey crepe dress patterned with purple, green and red birds by Shape. Pablo and Delia suede thong necklace. Blue suede shoes at Sacha.

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Beige suede skirt with applique shapes and matching shawl by Mary Quant. Necklace from Buckle Under. Beige suede boots by Guy Humphries.

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Blue and white feather printed chiffon dress by Zandra Rhodes.

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Left to right: Chiffon blouse and multi-coloured skirt by Foale and Tuffin. Painted rainbow shoes from Mr Freedom. Painted belt by Shape. // Cream and red jersey catsuit (top only showing) and banded red and cream skirt both from Stirling Cooper. Red shoes by Kurt Geiger. // Cream, yellow and red jersey dress by Stirling Cooper. Pull on hat by Janice Peskett. // Red cotton t-shirt by Erica Budd. Cream dungarees from Stirling Cooper. Red python sandals at Elliotts.

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Above: Mauve satin cotton pinafore dress and blouse by Gladrags. Right: Bottom half of Alistair Cowin calico trousers with green printing. Green and yellow shoes by Terry de Havilland. Far right: Black velvet dungarees with white satin applique heart from Mr Freedom. Chiffon blouse from Foale and Tuffin. Mauve canvas boots at Charles Jourdan.


Inspirational Images: Shaggy, colourful, zippered and buckled…

Going Away From Coats - Vanity Fair - August 71 - John Bishop

Coats by Daniel Hechter.

Photographed by John Bishop.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, August 1971.


Inspirational Editorials: Take Cover

take cover - vanity fair - november 1968 - david stafford - foale tuffin

Warm and cuddly coat to brave a winter’s night. Belted and snug double-breasted fur fabric maxi-style to wear over anything except gala gear. Great with trousers. Foale and Tuffin, 18gns long or 16gns short. Long white kid boots by Anello and Davide, 12gns.

Nothing is more depressing than dolling yourself up to the nines – and putting an everyday coat over your party hear. Mink stoles are too ageing for words and short coats over long dresses look awful.

Photographed by David Stanford.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, November 1968.

take cover - vanity fair - november 1968 - david stafford - biba

If you go out a lot and wear long or short evening dresses or lots of trouser suits, a full-length velvet coat looks marvellously dramatic. This one in scarlet or black has a great romantic collar and elegant arum lily sleeves. At Biba, 8gns. Knitted dress by Jean Allen.


Inspirational Editorials: Wear Crazy Pedal-Pushers

Short sleeved pale lilac sweater by Beckol from Chelsea Girl. Silvery-grey cotton pedal pushers by Antony Price from Che Guevera. Red, white and blue tartan shoes from Zapata. Wide red elasticated belt by Otto Glantz.

Short sleeved pale lilac sweater by Beckol from Chelsea Girl. Silvery-grey cotton pedal pushers by Antony Price from Che Guevara. Red, white and blue tartan shoes from Zapata. Wide red elasticated belt by Otto Glantz.

Alright, your curves are generous, and your behind is big, but hooray! This is the look for you. We’re back to the era of pneumatic sweater girls, when clothes fitted like the skin of a peach, waists were pulled in with firm wide belts and everyone teetered on high, high heels. Now it’s all camped up with bright plastic jewellery, headscarves and colourful wooly sox (Twiggy-types will just have to resort to falsies and push up bras ‘cos, baby, it’s our turn now!)

Intriguingly, after all that copy about curves, the model is credited as wearing a padded bra with plastic air-filled falsies by Berlei…

Photographed by David Montgomery.

Photographs by courtesy of the Piccadilly Bowling Centre, 30 Shaftesbury Avenue.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, January 1972

Short sleeved sewater by Beckol from Chelsea Girl. Satin pedal pushers by Gillian Richard. Red suede platform shoes by Chelsea Cobbler. Red leather belt from Bus Stop.

Short sleeved sewater by Beckol from Chelsea Girl. Satin pedal pushers by Gillian Richard. Red suede platform shoes by Chelsea Cobbler. Red leather belt from Bus Stop.

Red dolman sleeved sweater by Erica Budd. Pedal pushers made by rolling up footless tights by Mary Quant. Red leather belt from Bus Stop. Black snake platofmr shoes from the Chelsea Cobbler.

Red dolman sleeved sweater by Erica Budd. Pedal pushers made by rolling up footless tights by Mary Quant. Red leather belt from Bus Stop. Black snake platform shoes from the Chelsea Cobbler.


Inspirational Editorials: Maybe I was just born liberated

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Stirling Cooper

This photoshoot, featuring the brilliantly named Celestia Sporborg, is another one of my all-time favourites, and one I have put off scanning for a long while because Vanity Fair is actually a rather painful magazine to scan. The gummed spine, with age, does not enjoy being flattened so it requires extra effort to maintain some kind of structural integrity. I couldn’t NOT scan though. I love these images. I love the blurriness, her natural facial expressions, the very domestic backdrop and, of course, the completely mind-blowingly fabulous clothes. I don’t know where to start. That Stirling Cooper above is just so modern. And the Radley playsuit, so very Glam. And the Ossie… Plus Alice Pollock, Foale and Tuffin and a Ritva sweater I sold on Vintage-a-Peel a few years back

It also identifies the shots from Vanity Fair’s Guide to Modern Etiquette, ‘Nice Girls Do’, which I posted about before. To contextualise this shoot, the entire June issue is dedicated to feminism and liberation. Certainly one of the main reasons I love Vanity Fair almost above all other magazines of the period is the fact that they would theme all the contents of an issue, including the fashion spreads.

Celestia Sporborg is now a casting director herself, with over a hundred film credits on IMDB. She married theatre and film producer Robert Fox (brother of James and Edward) in 1975 and they had three children together.

Photographed by Frank Horvat.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, June 1971

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Foale & Tuffin

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Radley

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Ossie Clark

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Ritva

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Alice Pollock


Inspirational Editorials: Party Line

Strapless dress in pure paper silk taffeta should turn every head just with its rustle. By Bob Schulz, £45 from Patsy B Boutique, 6 Upper Grosvenor Street, W1. Lightly boned bodice so you don't rely entirely on willpower!

Strapless dress in pure paper silk taffeta should turn every head just with its rustle. By Bob Schulz, £45 from Patsy B Boutique, 6 Upper Grosvenor Street, W1. Lightly boned bodice so you don’t rely entirely on willpower!

Photographed by David Anthony. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, April 1972.

The same again only different. Bob Schulz paper silk taffeta dress. Glamour like we haven't had it since Cyd Charisse - and thank God it's back. Lond dress made to order for grand party entrances.

The same again only different. Bob Schulz paper silk taffeta dress. Glamour like we haven’t had it since Cyd Charisse – and thank God it’s back. Long dress made to order for grand party entrances.


Vintage Adverts: Meet your Swedish Playmate

abecita advert vanity fair april 72

Abecita advert scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, April 1972