Scents to Soak in

scents to soak in

Illustrated by Philip Castle.

Scanned from Harpers Bazaar, March 1969

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Inspirational Images: Enter right dramatically…

enter right dramatically - leslie poole - bob freeman harpers bazaar april 1969

Long turquoise satin dress, about 21 gns. White kid boots, 18 gns to order from The Chelsea Cobbler.

The setting is one of undefined menace. The situation, traumatic. The girl, intrigued. But the message of the fashion is crystal clear. Dramatic, beautifully made clothes are rare. When they combine fine fabrics with feminine shapes they become almost impossible to find. Now, at last, one designer, Leslie Poole, is making them. The supplies and outlets are limited – so far. The demand, however, is quite undeniable.

Scenario by Gerard Brach. Production by Molly Parkin.

Photographed by Bob Freeman.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers Bazaar, April 1969


Inspirational Images: Thea Porter and Pineapple

Embroidery from top to toe - pitch black design worked in panels on a natural calico shirt and knee length skirt, narrowly piped with scarlet; £24, Thea Porter. Natural canvas boots embroidered to match; 15gns to order, Chelsea Cobbler.

Embroidery from top to toe – pitch black design worked in panels on a natural calico shirt and knee length skirt, narrowly piped with scarlet; £24, Thea Porter. Natural canvas boots embroidered to match; 15gns to order, Chelsea Cobbler.

Excitement and anticipation is – quite rightly – building for the opening of the Fashion and Textile Museum’s new Thea Porter exhibition (6th February – 3rd May 2015). Guest curated by the lovely Laura McLaws Helms, who has also written the accompanying book, it is surely set to be the exhibition of the year. My Thea gypsy dress is somewhere in there, but having got a sneaky peek last week I can safely say that it will be blown out of the water by the extraordinarily beautiful pieces which have been gathered from a wide variety of sources (as well as ephemera from the archive and a recreation of her glorious dining room).

So to whet your appetite, here’s my dream Thea outfit (well, one of many…) — complete with matching embroidered Chelsea Cobbler boots.

Photographed by Just Jaeckin.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers Bazaar, April 1970.


Designer Focus: Bibette Wainwright

Bibette Wainwright

On beads and bibelots . . . and 23-year-old BIBETTE WAINWRIGHT, below, who wears them and makes them. Bibette, incidentally, spent three years at Bristol University and took a degree in psychology. Slim and delicate, with pale blonde hair and pre-Raphaelite looks, Bibette is a great health food fanatic, eats only macrobiotic foods. She works in her large studio-cum-bed-sit, bare save for the Larry Smart posters of Jimmy Hendricks [sic] and a motley wardrobe of granny dresses, silk pyjamas and fur coats, hung round the walls and collected from the antique markets which she spends hours exploring and which is where she first became interested in Victorian jewellery and beading. Tucked away under the window is her collection of beads. Clustering in boxes, beautiful glass beads — opaque Victorian glass, brilliant shining modern crystals. These she strings by hand into chokers and bracelets, belts and headbands. The designs are adapted from Japanese and Indian motifs, but sort of have a ’20s feel about them — and Bibette will design to order. From about 2½gns to 10gns, they are available from a selection at Thea Porter, 8 Greek Street, W1 or to order direct from Bibette at 26 East Tenter St, E1.

Photographed by Bill Holden.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers Bazaar, April 1970


Inspirational Images: Herbs that care for your skin

herbs that care for your skin harpers bazaar dinah april 1970

Photographed by Dinah

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers Bazaar, April 1970


Inspirational Editorials: Legs Go Under Cover

Left to right: White crepe bolero and trousers by Gina Fratini. White shoes by Kurt Geiger / Satin trousers and matching chiffon top in print by Celia Birtwell, both by Ossie Clark at Quorum. Red leather shoes by Chrystal of Copenhagen. / Black silk organza shirt and trousers in Bianchini's black silk organza flocked with velvet, both from Thea Porter. Cord belt from Piero de Monzi. Wide jewelled belt and double chain and green stone belt from Ken Lane. Black satin shoes by Kirt Geiger. / Black cire trouser suit from The Fulham Road Clothes Shop. Black letaher boots by Thea Chelsea Cobbler. Black and cream silk scarf from Thea Porter

Left to right: White crepe bolero and trousers by Gina Fratini. White shoes by Kurt Geiger / Satin trousers and matching chiffon top in print by Celia Birtwell, both by Ossie Clark at Quorum. Red leather shoes by Chrystal of Copenhagen. / Black silk organza shirt and trousers in Bianchini’s black silk organza flocked with velvet, both from Thea Porter. Cord belt from Piero de Monzi. Wide jewelled belt and double chain and green stone belt from Ken Lane. Black satin shoes by Kirt Geiger. / Black cire trouser suit from The Fulham Road Clothes Shop. Black leather boots by The Chelsea Cobbler. Black and cream silk scarf from Thea Porter

Everyone is tired of hearing that the mini skirt is on the way out.
Nearly as tired as when they heard it was on the way in.
These things in fashion die a very slow death,
but in this case one reason has been the lack of alternative.
Designers made too great a leap with the maxi,
and too indefinite a move with the midi.
After extremely short skirts,
something flapping around mid calves did feel extremely frumpish.
This was tied in with the fact that no boot manufacturers at
that time were making them with high enough heels,
essential with a longer skirt,
and it was very difficult to find feminine unclumpy
shoes which gave enough of a lift.
Now footwear is changing.
Boots are tall and beautifully fitting.
l-ligh-heeled shoes — very high — are pretty,
well proportioned and extremely flattering.
And so one branch of fashion may well be influencing another.
ln the end everything is a matter of proportions.
When skirts went up, heels came down.
The high stilettos we used to hobble around in so painfully,
not really that long ago,
looked far too tarty with hemlines halfway up the thigh and even
worse with trousers, especially tight ones.
Since most women feel their legs to be too short,
and the wearing of the heel as very necessary to a feeling of femininity,
this cancelled out the wearing of trousers for a very large number.
Until a short time ago trousers were being worn by,.
apart from men of course,
women who looked like men — that is, girls with no curves.
Lean hips. Long legs — in flat shoes.
Now for the first time comes the alternative to the mini skirt. Trousers.
That is, until hemlines decide exactly how far they will drop.
As drop they will.
Footwear has helped provide the solution.
It will comfort many to know that the models in the
pictures which follow, averaging 32″-35″ hips, still have
to choose, very carefully, shapes which suit them.
Their legs are long but still need the added inches that a high
heel gives them. Their shapes are slim, but female.
Still sometimes round enough to need the camouflage of a long jacket,
cardigan or tunic. They show that closely fitting
trousers can be sexier and will also make you look fatter.
They show that a small waist is made smaller by a high
cut rather than a hipster style.
Most of the trousers for evening lit well over the hips but flare out
in a very feminine, flattering way.
They are glittery, shiny, and see-through.
Beautiful in fact; better than ever before.

Alas, now that mini skirts are accepted just about everywhere.
we have to warn that trousers, for women that is, aren’t.
An appalling number of top London hotels
still hold fast to outdated rules about them.
Officially they are not allowed in, even to drink,
let alone to dine or to have lunch.
ln the Dorchester they can’t even have tea!
In the Mirabelle: Ofhcially, trousers are not admitted.
The question does not arise much at lunch—tirne
as there are never very many women there.
ln the evening the rule has now been relaxed and you
would be permitted to dine in trousers.
Talk of the Town: Certainly you may wear trousers.
Savoy: They now allow very dressy evening trousers in public rooms
but no daytime trousers at all.
Wearing them to private functions in private rooms
is left to the discretion of the organisers.
Dorchester: You would not be served anything
when wearing a trouser suit.
This applies to all public rooms,
but for banquets and other private functions it is up to the organisers.
Connaught: Officially not allowed at any time in the bar or restaurant,
but it is a decision left to the manager.
Carlton Tower: Trousers are not encouraged in the Rib or
Chelsea Rooms, but they are coming to accept them.
They prefer lunch-time trousers to evening ones.
Westbury: Trousers are not allowed in the bar or restaurant;
this applies to evenings too.
However, this rule, like others, is relaxed from time to time,
eg, when Brigitte Bardot arrives in trousers from the
airport – or Lord Snowdon arrives for dinner in a roll-neck shirt.
Hilton: Officially no trouser suits in the Roof Restaurant.
Unofficially you could get away with it if it’s
a very beautiful catsuit or something similar.
At private functions it depends on the organisers.
Ritz: No rule for the daytime, it just depends on the trousers!
Usually it is permitted to wear trousers
in the evening, but again it depends . . .
Claridge’s: Very strict,
definitely no trouser suits in the public rooms,
though they say you can wear what you like in private!
Crockford’s: They don’t object to them at all.
Coq d’Or: They much prefer to see a lady dressed as a lady.
During the day they prefer skirts
but don’t object to trousers in the evening at all.
White Tower: lf the woman looks elegant and well-dressed she is let in,
otherwise she may be told that the restaurant is full.
Brown’s: No objections at all for either day or evening
in either restaurant or bar provided the wearer looks neat and tidy.
Les Ambassadeurs: Don’t mind couture—cut or evening trouser suits,
but don’t like anything untidy like blue jeans.
Caprice: Quote from the reservations man:
‘l am sure we can have no objections.
women eat here in trousers all the time’

Words by Molly Parkin. Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

The eagle-eyed among you may have spotted the Ossie Clark ensemble which won Dress of the Year in 1969. For an item which won such a prestigious award, it’s always amazed me that I haven’t seen more contemporary images of it. I suppose it’s quite ‘out there’, even by late Sixties standards, but thankfully Molly Parkin was always pretty way out there.

If you can make your way through all the text, it’s a pretty impressive and important insight into the attitudes towards women in trousers in late Sixties Britain. It’s easy to forget how scandalous it could be, even in 1969 – a good four years after we first saw Emma Peel in John Bates’s trouser suit designs in The Avengers, for a woman to wear trousers. People obviously did it, you see enough fashion spreads to know that, but the list of swanky hotels and restaurants who still would refuse entry and service to a woman in trousers is quite extraordinary.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers Bazaar, April 1969.

legs go under cover 2

Left to right: White voile peasant shirt and wide pink, blue and turquoise brocade belt with gilt buckle, both from Thea Porter. Trousers in shell pink silk chiffon with sequins by Gina Fratini / Cyclamen silk shirt with full extravagant sleeves and purple trousers in Warner’s silk damask furnishing fabric, both by Thea Porter/ Brocade belt with gilt buckle by Swordtex from a selection at Mr Fish. / Gipsy bolero in silk brocade and cream organdy trousers, both from Thea Porter. Long orange and yellow scarf wound around waist from Flora Boutique. Chain belt studded with flowers from Browns. More jewelled belts and chains from a selection at Ken Lane.


Inspirational Illustrations: Jean Muir, 1969

muir bazaar oct 1969

Jean Muir thinks… then designs… and creates a fashion role of pure allure. Enter the Intellectual Seductress. Panther-like grace in a long, lean look. Colours sombre, yet potent, slithered clotsely over the body. Eve, circa 1970, wittily playing serpentine print against the real thing.

Illustrated by David Wolfe. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers Bazaar, October 1969