Christmas Colours

Christmas Colours - Stephen Bobroff - 19 Dec 69 - 1

Calf length New York skyline-printed crepe dress with deep neckline, narrow fitting sleeves and wide sash tied at the back. The same dress with wide bell shaped over sleeves. Both from Mr Freedom. Rings from Biba.

The look for Christmas is definitely one of bright colours and generally good cheer. Fabrics are crepes, satins and velvets in stained glass hues of rich reds, blues, greens, yellows and purples…

Photographed by Stephen Bobroff.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, December 1969.

Christmas Colours - Stephen Bobroff - 19 Dec 69 - 7

Long crepe kaftan style dress by Mr Freedom. Red chiffon scarf by Fenwicks. Yellow and black crepe trouser suit by Mr Freedom. Red leather boots from Sacha. Black crochet cap by Ritva at Feathers.

Christmas Colours - Stephen Bobroff - 19 Dec 69 - 2

Ankle length satin dress over printed in mauve with floppy bell shaped sleeves and long matching scarf by Pourelle. Purple crepe calf length dress with narrow fitting sleeves, lace up neckline and wide cape style collar by Ossie Clark for Quorum. Boots by Sacha.

Christmas Colours - Stephen Bobroff - 19 Dec 69 - 3

Purple narrow fitting t-shirt. Ankle length crushed velvet skirt in pink with purple velvet waistband. Both by Mr Freedom. Purple leather boots by Anello & Davide. Cardigan style dress in dark blue velvet splashed with yellow and red by Gordon King. Bright red crepe ankle length skirt by Ossie Clark for Quorum.

Christmas Colours - Stephen Bobroff - 19 Dec 69 - 4

Pale pink acetate jersey ankle length skirt and v-shaped bra top with narrow straps crossing over at back by Wallis. Black crochet cap by Ritva at Feathers. Pale green crepe ankle length skirt with matching front lacing bra top by Tony Berkeley.

Christmas Colours - Stephen Bobroff - 19 Dec 69 - 5

Long tapestry coat by Janice Wainwright at Simon Massey. Bright green narrow t-shirt by Mr Freedom. Pale pink damask narrow-fitting long coat by Janice Wainwright for Simon Massey. Silk scarves from Biba.

Christmas Colours - Stephen Bobroff - 19 Dec 69 - 6

Ankle length zip fronted cafe crepe dress has softly gathered deep yoke by Tony Berkeley. Red, blue and yellow scarf by Sujon. Ankle length soft pink crepe dress by Tony Berkeley. Long printed Indian scarf from Feathers.

Christmas Colours - Stephen Bobroff - 19 Dec 69 - 8

Bolero top and mid-calf skirt by Simon Jeffrey. Ankle length dress in pure Liberty wool and matching bolero by Gladrags. Red mid calf boots by Anello and Davide.

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Paint Your Own Conversation Piece

evette - 19 - march 72

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, March 1972


Christmas Wrapping

Christmas wrapping - Peccinotti - 3

Long silver, gold and blue taffeta dress with huge puff sleeves nd ruched bodice, £22. Blue leather court shoes on high platforms and very high heels, £7.45. Blue shot lurex chiffon scarf, 20p. All from Biba.

Unwrapping Christmas presents can cause thrills of excitement or groans of despair but, whatever you find inside, the sense of occasion is always there. We’ve proved our sense of occasion by wrapping up the best Christmas clothes for your parties; showing off the lovely, sexy, lurex, satins and natty netting you’ll be adorning yourself with this party season. Glamour and glitter are here to stay, so wrap yourself up in our Christmas wrapping and you’ll be the best Christmas present anyone’s had this year!

I can only hope in vain that I will find boxes of Biba and Miss Mouse under my Christmas tree, but still it’s a nice fantasy to have! As always, a deliciously quirky concept by Mr Peccinotti and 19’s usual flawless taste in clothes…

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, December 1972.

Christmas wrapping - Peccinotti - 1

LEFT: Black satin elasticated tube sweater, covered in stretch netting, £7. Matching black skirt with silver braid and silver spots, £10-50. Both by Miss Mouse. Green tights, from Biba, 30p. Black suede shoes with silver snake-skin trim on heel and toe, from Derber, £13-99. Lurex shot chiffon scarf, 20p. Tiny fake diamond rings, 5p. each. Both from Biba. Green glass bead bracelet, by Paul Stephens, 25p. RIGHT: Black satin heart-shaped strapless top, with gold and silver spots in lurex. Matching Oxford bags. Both by Miss Mouse, £20 the set. Silver shoes with very high heels, by Zapata, £15.75. Red shot lurex scarf, 20p. Red stud ear- rings with gold flecks, 20p. Matching bracelets, £1.20 each. All from Biba.

Christmas wrapping - Peccinotti - 2

Black jersey dress with silver lurex spotted top and inset pleats has long sleeves, by Gillian Richard, £8.20. Silver lurex tights, by Mary Ouant. £1-50. Black suede shoes with silver snake-skin print, from Derber, £13.99. Diamante choker, by Paul Stephens, 40p. Black wool halter-neck top spotted with silver lurex and with silver straps, by Erica Budd, £3.60. Black satin ankle-length skirt, from Bus Stop, £5.95. Silver lurex tights, by Mary Quant, £1.50. Silver metallic leather shoes, from Ravel, £10-50. Long silver lurex gloves, by Morley, £2.15. Diamante choker, by Paul Stephens, 40p. Diamante heart earrings, from Biba, £1.15.

Christmas wrapping - Peccinotti - 4

LEFT: Silver and grey knitted lurex long-sleeved polo-neck sweater, £3.50. Silver lurex cardigan with grey rose and two pockets, £9.95. Both from Bus Stop. Long grey satin skirt, by Walter Albini from Browns, £6.30. Tights by Mary Quant. £1.50. Platform sandals. from Ravel, £10.50. Bracelets. from Fenwick, 90p. each. Diamante and pearl-drop earrings, by Paul Stephens, £1.20. RIGHT: Long silver lurex halter-neck dress with silver and black lurex wavy trim on heart-shaped neck and side pleat inset. by Gillian Richard. £9.50. Matching cardigan with wavy-trim pockets. by Richard Green. £6.80. Silver lurex tights, by Mary Quant. £1.50. Silver metallic leather shoes. with platform soles and peep-toes, from Ravel, £10.50. Diamante drop earrings. by Paul Stephens. £1.10. Silver and black halter-neck lurex top, which buttons at front of waist, £5. Matching ankle-length wavy-print skirt, £8.60. Both by Richard Green. Black suede shoes with snakeskin print, from Derber, £1399. Long black satin gloves, by F. G. Shave, £2.75. Diamante bracelets. £1 each. Drop earrings. £1. Both by Paul Stephens.

Christmas wrapping - Peccinotti - 5

Green, gold and black lurex georgette shirt with long dolman sleeves and trimmed in black satin on v-neck and cuffs, £11. Long black satin skirt, £9.50. Both from Universal Witness. Green tights, from Biba, 30p. Silver court shoes with very high heel, and ankle strap, by Zapata, £15.75. Black and silver necklace. £2.90. Diamante stud earrings, £1. Both by Paul Stephens.

Christmas wrapping - Peccinotti - 6

Black and silver fine-striped lurex halter-neck sweater, with matching striped cardigan, by McCaul, £8 the set. Black satin trousers with turn-ups and high waist, by Richard Green, £7.70. Silver tights, by Mary Quant, £1.50. Black suede shoes with silver and red ‘snakeskin’ print and silver ankle-straps, by Leicester Shoes. £15.95. Thin diamante belt. £7.50. Single row diamante bracelet, £1. Both by Paul Stephens. Dangling diamante earrings. from Biba, 60p.

Christmas wrapping - Peccinotti - 7

Cream crepe shirt with long puff sleeves, £4.50. Matching tunic with green satin piping on short sleeves and green, yellow and cream sequin motif, £1850. Green satin trousers, £10. All by Quorum. Gold leather shoes with gold snakeskin print, from Derber, £13.99. Green lurex bow tie to make from remnants.


All That Glitters

All That Glitters 3

Bitter choc lurex suit by Pourelle, 13gns. Cat suit with fine straps by Pourelle, 12gns. Shoes by Dolcis, 89s 11d

Out of the sombre tones of last year’s black evening dress, emerges the exciting new glitter story for autumn. Light-as-a-feather Lurex, made up into cool, clinging styles, helps you shimmer through those soft, romantic evenings.

Photographed by Stuart Brown in the flat belonging to interior designer John Wright of Walker, Wright and Schofield, and also in Mr Chow’s restaurant.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, September 1969.

All That Glitters 4

Pink silver-sequined georgette dress by Gillian Richard, 11gns.

 

All That Glitters 2

Gold lurex jumpsuit by Pourelle, 13gns. Gold lurex dress and trousers by Pourelle, 13gns. Shoes from Russell and Bromley, £8 9s.

 

All That Glitters 5

Bitter choc lurex long sleeved dress by Pourelle, 9½gns. Black shoes by Elliott, 7gns.

 

All That Glitters 1

Silver lurex shirt dress worn over matching trousers by Pourelle, 13gns. Silver shoes by Russell and Bromley, 7gns.

 

All That Glitters 8

Silver lurex evening suit by Pourelle, 15gns. Silver shoes by Russell and Bromley, £8 19s.

 

All That Glitters 6

Bitter choc Lurex dress by Pourelle, 7½gns.

 

All That Glitters 7

Black sequined georgette dress by Gillian Richard, 8gns.

 

 


I was the mainstay of the Public Library…

smirnoff - 19 magazine - oct 72

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, October 1972


Pretty Things

Pretty Things 3

Left: Green felt hat from Bombacha. Grey crepe top and matching skirt both by Strawberry Studio. Gloves by Tuttabankem. Silk scarf by Eddie Yap for Howie. Right: Navy blue hat by Charles Batten. Green crepe top and matching skirt by Strawberry Studio. Gloves by Tuttabankem. Scarf from Essences. Brooch from Bombacha.

Skirts are big news! They come in soft, pretty fabrics like crepe and flanesta. Looks are soft and sweet too. So go feminine. Wear skirts that are full, and keep warm with chunky sweaters and long, knitted scarves.

Photographed by Arthur Elgort.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, October 1974.

Pretty Things 5

Left: Rust felt hat by Marida. Rust crepe de chine suit by Marie France. Mixed tweedy cardigan by Outlander. Brown leather shoes by Bombacha. Scarf by Eddie Yap for Howie. Bag from Nostalgia. Right: Hat by Edward Mann. Cream blouse and grey crepe de chine suit all by Marie France. Huge grey cardigan by Crochetta. Grey lace up shoes from Sacha. Silky scarf by Eddie Yap for Howie. Brooch from Bombacha.

Pretty Things 1

Left: Hat by Edward Mann. Blouse by Garilee. Wool cardigan by Johnson & Johnson. Skirt from C&A. Shoes from Sacha. Right: Hat from Bombacha. Green blouse by Garilee. Wool v-neck top by Outlander. Cardigan by Johnson & Johnson. Skirt from C&A. Shoes by Sacha. Beads from Bombacha. Brooch by Adrien Mann.

Pretty Things 2

Left: Red and white striped wool tank top and matching cardigan by Outlander. Cream crepe skirt by Mushroom. Right: Flannel beret at Essences. Cream crepe blouse by Jon Elliot. Cream tank top and matching cardigan by C&A. Pale pink crepe skirt by Marie France.

Pretty Things 4

Left: Blue felt hat by Charles Batten. White silk shirt by Carr Jones. Blue cord pinafore dress by Strawberry Studio. Leather shoes from Bombacha. Silk scarf from Essences. Right: Hat from Nostalgia. White Chinese shirt by Carr Jones. Blue tweed hacking jacket by Jenny Hare at Bombacha. Skirt by Inega. Shoes from Bombacha. Bag from Essences. Scarf by Eddie Yap for Howie.


Well, there has to be a first time, doesn’t there?

Well, there has to be a first time, doesn't thereHe’s twenty-five. He’s wearing boots. He has this smile that makes you think of your pony back home in Sussex. He asks you out. You’ve been in London three weeks. You’ve been to the movies alone five times. You’ve eaten thirteen tins of baked beans. You think he looks dangerous. You accept. He takes you for a meal—one they used to put on expense accounts and now write off to personal sex accounts.

He’s wearing a snakeskin suit. It has the insidious imprint of the King’s Road Own Seduction Corps. King’s regulations are strictly for the birds and you’re barely hatched. You’ve made the first move backwards by wearing a very almost-not-there dress which Mummy said was common when you were home last weekend.

His car smells of polished leather and Brut and you were warned that Devon Violets is suspect, in spite of granny-chat. It’s a cover-up for you-know-what. You murmur among the traffic lights. You park among the foreign number plates. The CD’s scream their immunity from dangerous corners, double yellow lines and fire station forecourts.

The restaurant is sadly assembled. Small and dull, you share the regulation banquet with eight others. Tables have to be shuffled every time some-one wants to move.

You trail fringes in and out of your neighbour’s potage au pea and, again, later, through the empty plate, scooping and spinning the spoon.

You have a dry martini because they do in TV serials and in TV commercials with suave celebrities and because your father suggested it when his advice was sought. His reasons are probably the same.

You restrain a shudder as your larynx dehydrates and grab at the whitebait as it arrives like a marooned sailor would whistle for mermaids. Similarly. you wish the tiny heads were less wistful, the tiny tails less anguished. But you’re absorbed in the effort to show interest in your Mate’s Progress whilst trying to clean up the soupy and fringy bits without appearing to be scratching the bottom of the bowl.

You order something that looks like Coq au Rising, because it’s one of those witty places where the menu is badly chalked on an old slate with remarks like, `sorry drakes, the duck’s night off—try our Boeuf Havitoff instead’.

Everything is going to be disguised in tomato sauce with chopped peppers to hush it up and a few mushrooms, tired of waiting, to tone it down.

The creamed spinach has bits of the label off the tin concealed in it. After guiding it on a tour of your teeth, you swallow it rather than eject it from tongue to table. The sherry trifle is reminiscent of school lunches. Mucky, spongy left-over in a thin sauce. 

The coffee is aggressive. It scrapes the protesting throat. Nevertheless, sour and stewed, down it has to go, setting up a sacrificial reaction ‘from the wine, something red and spiteful, which could have been emulsion with thinners. The martini is already forgotten but not forgiven.

Your head blows off when it meets Fulham freshness.

The flat—his—is in a block where the central heating boasts with absurd exaggeration and there’s no air to need conditioning! It’s on the fourth floor. The lift is silent with warning.

You drop your coat on the hall chest, which itself has a mistletoe bough threat from its Peter Jones mock studdery. He leads you to maturity via a Conran sofa where, with all those occasional tables and two plastic poufs, romance would perish even between Heloise and Abelard. 

He says you’re very lovely, aren’t you? Enigmatically you smile at him as you unhook the fringe tethering his pocket zip to your prudent bust. He adds that you’ve an untouched quality. Enigma changes to wistful nostalgia for opportunities lost and then you feel a sudden, terrifying attack of wind. Losing your virginity is one thing, the risk of losing control of digestive outlets, is quite another.

Your muscles assume a rigidity in their counter-attack, which he assumes is modesty. He murmurs softly to relax, little girl, you can trust him. Trust him for what? A tablet to bring express relief? But the moment passes. Relief prompts honesty so you admit that you are, indeed, untouched.

He gently pulls at your shoulder strap. Here it comes. The pay-off. Your neckline was designed for display rather than subtlety and the slide of the shoulder strap suggests gar-rotting rather than seduction.

The wine, the warmth, the hum of collective combustion below, make soporific nonsense of energetic passion. Virginity is never its own reward, only someone else’s, but we must have something to tell Sue and all the others.

Zips slip. The silence is describable. Like heavy breathing or deep down from an eider. More compelling, much more inviting, more mysterious, more exciting than Mantovani’s melodious mood music.

Eyes close slowly. Langour is your mantra.

Moment of truth . . . a novice in the Yearling Stakes, you surge forward on the thrust of optimism. But the whitebait and the chicken stew and the trifle rise, too, in defence of your honour and purity.

Hold it! The sour coffee, the sauce, the one martini—yes, even and the almost dry martini, forgiven. Control is ruined and so is the Conran gingham. But not, dear, your virginity!

Text by Diana Cooper.

Illustration by Malcolm Bird

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, April 1972.