Well, there has to be a first time, doesn’t there?

Well, there has to be a first time, doesn't thereHe’s twenty-five. He’s wearing boots. He has this smile that makes you think of your pony back home in Sussex. He asks you out. You’ve been in London three weeks. You’ve been to the movies alone five times. You’ve eaten thirteen tins of baked beans. You think he looks dangerous. You accept. He takes you for a meal—one they used to put on expense accounts and now write off to personal sex accounts.

He’s wearing a snakeskin suit. It has the insidious imprint of the King’s Road Own Seduction Corps. King’s regulations are strictly for the birds and you’re barely hatched. You’ve made the first move backwards by wearing a very almost-not-there dress which Mummy said was common when you were home last weekend.

His car smells of polished leather and Brut and you were warned that Devon Violets is suspect, in spite of granny-chat. It’s a cover-up for you-know-what. You murmur among the traffic lights. You park among the foreign number plates. The CD’s scream their immunity from dangerous corners, double yellow lines and fire station forecourts.

The restaurant is sadly assembled. Small and dull, you share the regulation banquet with eight others. Tables have to be shuffled every time some-one wants to move.

You trail fringes in and out of your neighbour’s potage au pea and, again, later, through the empty plate, scooping and spinning the spoon.

You have a dry martini because they do in TV serials and in TV commercials with suave celebrities and because your father suggested it when his advice was sought. His reasons are probably the same.

You restrain a shudder as your larynx dehydrates and grab at the whitebait as it arrives like a marooned sailor would whistle for mermaids. Similarly. you wish the tiny heads were less wistful, the tiny tails less anguished. But you’re absorbed in the effort to show interest in your Mate’s Progress whilst trying to clean up the soupy and fringy bits without appearing to be scratching the bottom of the bowl.

You order something that looks like Coq au Rising, because it’s one of those witty places where the menu is badly chalked on an old slate with remarks like, `sorry drakes, the duck’s night off—try our Boeuf Havitoff instead’.

Everything is going to be disguised in tomato sauce with chopped peppers to hush it up and a few mushrooms, tired of waiting, to tone it down.

The creamed spinach has bits of the label off the tin concealed in it. After guiding it on a tour of your teeth, you swallow it rather than eject it from tongue to table. The sherry trifle is reminiscent of school lunches. Mucky, spongy left-over in a thin sauce. 

The coffee is aggressive. It scrapes the protesting throat. Nevertheless, sour and stewed, down it has to go, setting up a sacrificial reaction ‘from the wine, something red and spiteful, which could have been emulsion with thinners. The martini is already forgotten but not forgiven.

Your head blows off when it meets Fulham freshness.

The flat—his—is in a block where the central heating boasts with absurd exaggeration and there’s no air to need conditioning! It’s on the fourth floor. The lift is silent with warning.

You drop your coat on the hall chest, which itself has a mistletoe bough threat from its Peter Jones mock studdery. He leads you to maturity via a Conran sofa where, with all those occasional tables and two plastic poufs, romance would perish even between Heloise and Abelard. 

He says you’re very lovely, aren’t you? Enigmatically you smile at him as you unhook the fringe tethering his pocket zip to your prudent bust. He adds that you’ve an untouched quality. Enigma changes to wistful nostalgia for opportunities lost and then you feel a sudden, terrifying attack of wind. Losing your virginity is one thing, the risk of losing control of digestive outlets, is quite another.

Your muscles assume a rigidity in their counter-attack, which he assumes is modesty. He murmurs softly to relax, little girl, you can trust him. Trust him for what? A tablet to bring express relief? But the moment passes. Relief prompts honesty so you admit that you are, indeed, untouched.

He gently pulls at your shoulder strap. Here it comes. The pay-off. Your neckline was designed for display rather than subtlety and the slide of the shoulder strap suggests gar-rotting rather than seduction.

The wine, the warmth, the hum of collective combustion below, make soporific nonsense of energetic passion. Virginity is never its own reward, only someone else’s, but we must have something to tell Sue and all the others.

Zips slip. The silence is describable. Like heavy breathing or deep down from an eider. More compelling, much more inviting, more mysterious, more exciting than Mantovani’s melodious mood music.

Eyes close slowly. Langour is your mantra.

Moment of truth . . . a novice in the Yearling Stakes, you surge forward on the thrust of optimism. But the whitebait and the chicken stew and the trifle rise, too, in defence of your honour and purity.

Hold it! The sour coffee, the sauce, the one martini—yes, even and the almost dry martini, forgiven. Control is ruined and so is the Conran gingham. But not, dear, your virginity!

Text by Diana Cooper.

Illustration by Malcolm Bird

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, April 1972.

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Summer Vamp

Summer Vamp - John Bishop - 19 August 70

19 visualises a Summer Vamp, and make-up is geared for a seductive summer. Shades of Dietrich abound – lips are invitingly red, eyes are lowered and stained with yellows, greens, plums and browns… Our model’s hair was dressed by Jason at Jingles. For a romantic effect we covered it with a black fishnet shawl by J.C.Brosseau from Feathers.

The stunning model is Willy van Rooy, who also happens to be the model that my mannequin is based on. For more background on this connection please click here. Willy is also a very talented designer, so do check out her website http://willyvanrooy.com/ or follow her on Instagram.

Photographed by John Bishop.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, August 1970.


Naked Esscents

naked esscents

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, May 1974.


Act Naturally

Act Naturally 1

Yellow cheesecloth blouse and matching shirt by Richard Green.

For those lazy, hazy days of summer, nothing is better to hang out in than loose, casual, breezy blouses and skirts. There are masses around to choose from and it seems that the smock top has really gathered strength this summer. Why not? It’s the best kind of top to feel really relaxed and liberated in. Wear it over old jeans, if you’re really the casual type, or over skirts down to ground level. One of the best and most comfortable buys to go with the look is soft cotton espadrilles, with rope soles, like the ones from Bata.

Photographed by David Anthony. Model: Charlotte Martin.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, July 1972.

Act Naturally 2

Green and white gingham blouse and matching long skirt and pinny, all by Spectrum.

Act Naturally 3

Gingham smock and matching skirt (not shown) by David Silverman. Jeans model’s own.

Act Naturally 4

T-shirt from selection at Biba. Smock top in crepe de chine and matching long skirt both by Madrugada. Red tights by Biba. Yellow espadrilles by Bata.

Act Naturally 5

White smock in fine wool by Jenny Hare.


Sweethearts

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Never had any nice undies? Then we’ve picked out a few, Of the best that are new, To do you from Mondays to Sundays.

Illustrations by Michael Roberts.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, April 1971.

Michael Roberts - 19 - April 71 - a


Charlotte Rampling by Hans Feurer

charlotte rampling - 19 - Hans Feurer - 1

Plunge-necked green shaded Trice! crepe dress, by John Bates for Jean Varon, approx. 14gns.

What is she really like? Very much a domesticated and warm-hearted girl, she is preparing to set up home with the man she loves. Although she usually favours clothes collected from Antique supermarkets, 19 chose these daringly-cut dresses to emphasise the underlying tiger in her make-up.

At twenty-three, and with five feature films to her credit, Miss Charlotte Rampling is now engaged in what is seemingly her most important project to date – setting up residence in a fashionable Westminster two-storey house with film-maker Tommy Weber, and his two shaggy-haired sons, Jake, aged nearly six, and Charlie, aged four.
Charlotte has been with Tommy for a year now, and when his divorce comes through, they plan to marry. Charlotte feels this will be ‘mostly for the children’s and my parents’ sake’.

She returned to England from Madrid four years ago, when she received her first film offer, landing a starring role in a Boulting Brothers comedy, Rotten To The Core. Following this movie, Charlotte appeared as Meredith, the super-shrew of Georgy Girl – and probably produced the totally misconceived image as a girl much like the one she played.

Charlotte describes Meredith as a real bitch’ of Georgy she says; “She was pathetic, but two-faced – not an admirable character.” Lyn Redgrave, however, was ‘absolutely beautiful’, and the film set was a happy one.

Charlotte has recently completed two films; Three, directed by Jim Salter, from an Irwin Shaw story, is spoken of with less than relish. What apparently started out as a free, flowing movie about three students bumming their may across Europe, ended up as a contused, under-budgeted affair, in which the hardships outnumbered the freedom.

Her most satisfying film to date, The Damned, is still being shot under the direction of Italy’s Luchino Visconti and she feels this was an invaluable experience. It is the story of the Krupp family, who rose to power in Hitler’s Germany.

Charlotte Rampling is now in the enviable position of having completed a major role, and possessing the chance to choose what she wants for the future.

Photographed by Hans Feurer.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, May 1969.

charlotte rampling - 19 - Hans Feurer - 2

Ribbon-trimmed plunge-necked blue shaded Tricel crepe dress, by John Bates for Jean Varon, approx. 13gns.

charlotte rampling - 19 - Hans Feurer - 3

Culotte dress in shaded beige to bream 7-ricel crepe, with tiny bodice and trans-parent nylon organza back, by John Bates for Jean Varon, approx. £17 6s. 6d. Gold sandals, by Ronald Keith, 5gns.

charlotte rampling - 19 - Hans Feurer - 4

Silk jersey black tie top and layered skirt, by Lizzy Carr, approx. 71/2gns. each.


Sentimental Journey

sentimental journey - gian barberis - 1

Striped top and matching crepe cardigan. Cream crepe trousers, all by Jackie Ross at Jon Elliot. Clutch bag by Biba. Blue and white striped scarf from Essences. Beige straw hat by Diane Logan / Green,, white and black striped cardigan is a 19 Magazine knitting pattern. Long cream gored skirt by Brave New World. Cream strappy straw sandals from Chelsea Cobbler.

back to romance with nostalgia and nostalgic clothes in romantic settings. Long, flowing scarves, mysterious veils and soft, sensuous fabrics for Sunday strolls or super dates — a wardrobe for summer sentimentalists

Hair by Robert at Ricci Burns.

Photographed by Gian Barberis.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, May 1974.

sentimental journey - gian barberis - 2

Green straw hat by Diane Logan. Green and cream printed crepe de chine dress by Gillian Richard. Cream knitted cardigan from Essences. Grey suede shoes from Bombacha. / Dark green chip straw ht by Diane Logan. Green and cream printed crepe de chine dress by Gillian Richard. Navy blue shoes from Bombacha.

sentimental journey - gian barberis - 3

Cream beret by Kangol. Halter top, matching white and blue silk knitted long cardigan. Matching calf-length knitted skirt all by Lison Bonfils at Joseph. Grey suede shoes from Bombacha. / Salmon pink beret by Kangol. Cream crepe sleeveless top with sequin motif. Matching below-the-knee culottes. Both by Jackie Ross for Jon Elliot. Salmon pink silky cardigan from Essences. Sandals from Chelsea Cobbler.

sentimental journey - gian barberis - 4

Brown felt hat from Nostalgia. Black and white crepe de chine dress by Jeff Banks. Cream cardigan by Essences. Shoes from Bombacha. / White suit with black pattern and reverse on cuffs and collar from Essences. Black suede shoes from Bombacha. Black scarf from Bus Stop.

sentimental journey - gian barberis - 5

Pink straw hat by Diane Logan. Crepe crepe jacket and matching mid-calf skirt by Bus Stop. Cream straw shoes by Chelsea Cobbler. / Black and tan cloche from Diane Logan. V neck top and matching crepe jacket and skirt all from Bus Stop. Straw shoes by Chelsea Cobbler. Scarf to match suit from Bus Stop.