Have Fun With Your Hair

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This feathered headdress by Pablo & Delia is exclusive to Leonards.

Get your hair all dressed up for Spring! Beauty girl Ann Morrow brings you the newest ideas for many a yer on the hair accessories scene. But no need to stop there all you want is a mop of hair and a little imagination to get a lot of head-turning effect.

Photographed by John Carter.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Petticoat, May 1971.

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Severe little buns and topknots look good with a snood added. This one came from Fenwick, and we added a bunch of cherries by Mr Freedom.

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With this painted slide by Pablo and Delia, John at Leonard gave model Chrissie an oriental look. Her hair is drawn back tightly to show off the coloured streak attached to the slide.

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These coloured streaks look like a bird of paradise – mail order them each from Annie Russel, 398 Kings Road.

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A slide with a feather from Miss Selfridge. Match your eyes to your slide.

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Play about with different slides. We found these in Miss Selfridge – apples that look good enough to eat.

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Evening hair goes all glittery with a headband from Fenwick and a Fortes-style slide with a sparkle from Boots.

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Flowered print are big news, so put some in your hair too  This lovely spring bunch comes ready attached to a comb from Miss Selfridge.

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Mild Sauce: The Bejewelled Bod

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Silver butterfly by Elsa Peretti for Halston.

Gift your valentine with the big, bold new bijous that are worn at all the best places.

Photographed by J. Frederick Smith.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Playboy, February 1971.

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Forehead ornament and ceramic bead necklace by Henri Bendel.

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Necklace, beaded belt and loincloth by Cliff Nicholson.

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Beaded headband, loin cover, arm and leg bracelets and numerous necklaces by Fredda Weisf.

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Rare Brazilian pendant from the collection of Fredda Weisf.

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Necklace by Cliff Nicholson.

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All by David Webb.

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Leopard belt and gold-plated costumewear by Kenneth J. Lane.


The Great Jewel Robbery

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Some men may wince at the thought of wearing anything more flash than an Alfa Romeo watch. And some girls will weep at the prospect of spending any of their salary on him. But there’s no doubt that a good deal of gilt-edged swopping is going on among the sexes. And I don’t mean that trad plain gold band. Much more interesting is the trend for loving couples to buy each other jewellery that they both can wear. It began a few years ago with gilt and elephant-hair rings that the likes of Twiggy and Justin used to sport. Then the Together People began exchanging chunky under-water watches and Cartier’s gold “love” bangles. Very simple, very expensive and very permanent because they are fastened with a screwdriver. Now that even jet-setters are uniformed like Steve McQueen in blue jeans, the latest swop-about jewellery is suitably chunky and shiny as a Harley-Davidson bike—see above: Peter Hinwood in a silver chain and bracelet from Andre Bogaert and ivory tusks from Butler and Wilson. The ear-ring is his own. Janni Goss is weighed down with two chromium bangles by Gijis Bakker, a stainless-steel belt by Emanuel Raft and a silver pendant by Helga Zahn. All one-offs and available at the Electrum Gallery, where customers include Julie Christie and Fenella Fielding. The girls order for themselves and their fellas. Gals and guys who prefer their jewellery on the frankly flash side—and they include Yoko and John Lennon—apply to Mick Milligan who designs the glitter stuff, worn by Barbara Trentham. and Gary Myers, below. Mick designs with his tongue in his cheek, like the BLANG! pins and the Rolls-Royce radiator badge, made in solid silver for Leonard, the London hairdresser, which Leonard’s wife also borrows. For females only: the “Diamonds are a girl’s best friend” necklet—naturally 100 per cent fake stones—which Barbara wears with a fistful of chrome rings. From a fiver each, you can tell Mick’s loot is more than a joke. Meanwhile he is laughing all the way to the bank, so BLANG! to you. Lurex knit is by Christopher McDonnell.

Photographed by Norman Eales. Text by Deirdre McSharry.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Cosmopolitan, March 1972.

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To Arms!

To Arms

We’ve found bracelets by the score at prices you won’t mind paying. You can wear them by the dozen like they were going out of style to camp up anything else you might be wearing!

Photographed by Errol Sawyer.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Petticoat, November 1973


Inspirational Editorials: Get Knitted

Knitted dress from The House of Worth. Hat at Brown's.

Knitted dress from The House of Worth. Hat at Brown’s.

Photographed by Sarah Moon. Styled by Cherry Twiss. Hair by Carita Salon.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from The Daily Telegraph Magazine, November 14th 1969

Skinny cardigan in boucle acrylic by Lee Bender at Bus Stop. Ring from Kutchinsky. Gold ring by Ken Lane.

Skinny cardigan in boucle acrylic by Lee Bender at Bus Stop. Ring from Kutchinsky. Gold ring by Ken Lane.

White ribbed catsuit by Sally Levison. Brass belt from David Elliott. Ring by Kutchinsky.

White ribbed catsuit by Sally Levison. Brass belt from David Elliott. Ring by Kutchinsky.

Maxi coat and trousers knitted by Women's Home Industries. Roll neck sweater dress by Virginia. Hat by Cerruti.

Maxi coat and trousers knitted by Women’s Home Industries. Roll neck sweater dress by Virginia. Hat by Cerruti.

Marled knit polo neck sweater with sleeveless waistcoat by Biba. Leather belt by Cerruti.

Marled knit polo neck sweater with sleeveless waistcoat by Biba. Leather belt by Cerruti.


Inspirational Editorials: Pearls. The Why. The where. And the How.

Bolero of pearly circles, with pearly petals making a brassiere. By Felicity Bosanquet for Vendome, to order from Marian McDonnell, 45 South Molton Street, W1

Bolero of pearly circles, with pearly petals making a brassiere. By Felicity Bosanquet for Vendome, to order from Marian McDonnell, 45 South Molton Street, W1

Coming in, pearls in quantities to make an oyster shrink. But never well-bred strings, Felicity Bosanquet’s idea of wearing pearls is lavish. She loops and circles them into a bolero, a skirt, slings them monster-sized around her waist. Try pearls. They’re good for you. Cleopatra took hers internally, like a Disprin.

Photographed by Hans Feurer.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Queen, 25th June-8th July 1969

Big pearls make a belt with dangling silvery tassels. By Felicity Bosanquet for Vendome, from Marrian McDonnell. Pearl ropes wound round and round the leg - by Adrian Mann, £125 each, at Liberty's.

Big pearls make a belt with dangling silvery tassels. By Felicity Bosanquet for Vendome, from Marrian McDonnell. Pearl ropes wound round and round the leg – by Adrian Mann, £125 each, at Liberty’s.

Skirted in pearls (You could slip a body-stocking on underneath, if you think it necessary). Swinging big and little circles, separate strings, by Felicity Bosanquet, to order from Marrian McDonnell.

Skirted in pearls (You could slip a body-stocking on underneath, if you think it necessary). Swinging big and little circles, separate strings, by Felicity Bosanquet, to order from Marrian McDonnell.


Starlet Nights

Upstaging madly in a flurry of feathers, flounces and faux jewels, our chorus line throws caution to  the wings and takes centre stage for a thousand and one glamour-puss nights, directed by Hamish Bowles, 19.

Left to right: Black taffeta dress by Murray Arbeid. Black velvet and rose fascinator by Stephen Jones. Black wool crepe sheath dress with feathers by Sheridan Barnett. Black marabou and ostrich feathered opera coat by Sheridan Barnett, from Roxy 25 Kensington Church Street. Mauve taffeta and velvet stripe dress by Murray Arbeid. Rose hat by Stephen Jones. Crystal drop earrings by Monty Don. Black sun-ray pleated lame and chiffon evening dress by Antony Price, to order from Ebony. Earrings by Andrew Logan.

Upstaging madly in a flurry of feathers, flounces and faux jewels, our chorus line throws caution to the wings and takes centre stage for a thousand and one glamour-puss nights, directed by Hamish Bowles, 19.

A fascinating little spread here, directed by a 19-year-old Hamish Bowles and featuring pieces by established designers like Sheridan Barnett, Murray Arbeid and the Antony Price I’d give my first born to own… Plus up and coming designers like Stephen Jones and Monty Don (yes, that Monty Don…). Plus the make-up was by iconic Sixties model, Maudie James. I’m not such a huge fan of Harpers and Queen in this period, but this spread is such a perfect combination of what had been and what was to come – which makes it a definite cut above the rest.

Photographed by Clive Arrowsmith.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers and Queen, August 1983