Tessa Kennedy by Norman Parkinson

Tessa and Cary wearing antique Afghanistani caftans in the garden room, a patterned passage really, where Cassian sleeps. A Kelim rug covers the bed, the cushions are sewn from Indian silk scarves. Caftans from Oxus, 490 Kings Road.

Tessa Kennedy lives down amongst trees and flowers on the Bayswater edge of Hyde Park; on a broiling blue July day it seemed more like the South of France with mimosa yellow awnings over the windows, white iron table and chairs set up on the terrace. On the corner of a great white classical block of houses, it’s a garden flat — no agent’s euphemism — knocked together from two; in the centre are a pair of tiny courtyards Tessa is changing into conservatories so that flowers can flower all year round: her sons can also wheel their bicycles straight out of doors to play. They are Cassian, Damian and Cary Elwes., 11, 10 and 7, and there’s Dylan, the baby, 7 months old.

Inside, a dramatic maze of rooms opens off the central chocolate-varnished corridor; everywhere carpets, tapestries, tartan and Indian silks make endless patterns. The old wine cellars have turned into great scarlet felt lined storage cupboards like the ones she designed for the Donald Davies shop, no dust can creep in. The drawing-room converts to a cinema built when Stanley Donen lived there; Tessa has hardly changed this at all. The projection room has mighty machines like the Marble Arch Odeon, she has registered herself as Kennedy Previews and has a projectionist hired full time—to show films to friends after dinner once or twice a week, or a couple of James Bond epics for the boys: “They love it of course and get absolutely boss-eyed.” Her fascination with gadgetry extends to video tapes, high-powered headphones for the stereo, intercom and a splendid American push-button dial telephone you can ring in on but not out. With the push-button stuff are clumps of fresh flowers, dog roses, daisies, piles of cushions in antique fabrics or in the flame stitch tapestry she sews on plane journeys, her collection of walnut shell sewing boxes, photograph, paintings—including a quartet of Louis XIV’s wife and mistresses—and carpet in a different colour but the same pattern as the one she designed for Burke’s restaurant. Burke’s is one of her decorating jobs she likes the best—along with Sir George and Lady Weidenfeld’s house and the flat she made for John Barry in an office block overlooking the Thames: “We installed such powerful sound that it moves right across the river and people coming out of the Tate look quite dazed.” Now she is working on a couple of country houses, one is for John Aspinall, and offices for Polydor records, and several new ideas, like a sauna in a storage cupboard, to build into this family and garden flat.

Yes, that’s little Cary Elwes at the tender age of seven. And of course it goes without saying that I would kill for those Theas…

Photographed by Norman Parkinson.

Scanned from Vogue, September 1970.

Patterns of carpet, tartan and voile in the drawing room cinema. The carpet is similar to the one Tessa designed for Burke’s; her voile dress with bib of rare oriental fabric comes from Thea Porter, £68.
Tessa in the hall, a varnished chocolate box hung with brown and white cottons. The gothic chairs are part of her collection. Her long scarlet chiffon robe, £35, from Thea Porter.

 

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Go Gaucho!

Striped woollen poncho skirt by Beatrice Bellini for WHI. Chamois lace-up blouse by Janet Ibbotson. Lace up suede boots by Anello and Davide. Leather and bead necklace by Feathers.

Not only does leather feel good, it smells delicious, like a trip out West. Suede and chamois are even better than leather because they are so much softer and easier tow ear. They’re not as expensive as they used to be. Cheap they will never be if you want value for your money. Leather, properly looked after, lasts for age; in fact, the more beaten up and old it looks the better. So when it comes to buying remember that and invest in something safe – like the clothes photographed on these pages. Thy are not desperately in fashion but, on the other hand, they are not out and never will be…

Fashion by Caroline Baker. Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned from Nova, October 1970.

Midi pigskin wrarpover skirt and long fitted jacket both by Beged’Or. Lace up suede boots from Anello and Davide.
Suede midi waistcoat and pants by Friitala. Brown wool shirt at Feathers. Leather and bead necklace at Feathers. Felt hat by Bermona. Stripey belts at Herbert Johnson.
Leather and rabbit midi waistcoat by Skinflair. Handwoven cotton blouse from Fifth Avenue. Flared blue jeans by Levis.
Suede jeans by Newman at Spotlight. Argentinian wool poncho – similar available at Mexicana and at Inti. Cow print velour hat by Bermona. Patent boots from Sacha.
Chamois fringed midi dress and beaded headband both at Battle Of The Little Big Horn.
Suede lace up dress to order at Pourelle. Poncho by Village Squares. Boots by Anello and Davide.
Fake snake velvet jeans by Newman at Feathers. Silk satin snake shirt to order at Lizzie Carr. Woven sash belts at Herbert Johnson.



Two Lovely Black Thighs

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Camisole and french knickers by Trisha Kerr Cross. Suspender belt by Charmerein. Shoes by Charles Jourdan. Pillbox hat by Charles Batten.

The black arts of what to wear next to your skin. Silk and satin, nylon and lace. Wickedly witty but not as black as they’re painted.

Hair by Jean Louis David. Make-up by Jacques Clement for Elizabeth Arden.

Photographed by Francois Lamy.

Scanned from Harpers and Queen, January 1979.

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Black body stocking wired under the bra by Gossard. White silk stockings by Funn.

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Nightdress by Charlotte Hilton for Finewear. Miniscule Italian knickers by Magic.

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Strapless corselette in black satin by Charmerein. Knickers by Rousard. Shoes by Charles Jourdan.

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Camiknickers by Tuttabankem.

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Nightdress in black lace by Janet Reger. Shoes by Charles Jourdan.

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French knickers in black voile, matching camisole and matching jacket not shown all by Jada from Harrods.


Let’s Make Up

Lets Make Up - John Bishop - 19 December 70

Katrine on the left, is our Biba model… Louise on the right is our Mary Quant model… Both chokers from Biba. Hair for both girls was by Didier from the Jean Louis Davide Salon, Paris. Make-up was devised by top French visagiste, Clement and photographed in Paris by John Bishop.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, December 1970.


The Great Coats

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Black panne velvet hat from Feathers. Exotic black floor length beaver-look Borg fur fabric coat by Ossie Clark at Quorum.

The title of this editorial reminds me of being in Dublin earlier this year. Just arrived, walking along trying to find our hotel, I was wearing a Seventies brown nappa leather trench coat (it was February and freezing). A girl strode past and without pausing to wait for a reaction or looking me in the eye she just said ‘Great coat’ and carried on walking. I decided I loved Dublin right there and then.

This spread features the stunning Charlotte Martin and was photographed in Austria. I’m still in love with my brown leather trench coat but I wouldn’t say no if any of these coats (particularly that Quorum stunner above) were to land in my lap this winter…

Photographed by John Bishop.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, December 1970.

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Black panne velvet hat by Feathers. Long chocolate jersey top with tight buttoned cuffs. Grey and rust mock Gonk shoulder cape. Both from Biba.

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Hat from Feathers. Dark brown and black Forties-style mock chipmunk jacket with self tie belt. Black wool pants with turn ups. Both from Biba. Wet-look boots from Dolcis.

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Plum Borg-lined jacket with leather elbow patches and trimmings by Daniel Hechter of Paris. Green barathea midi skirt by Gladrags. Tan leather leace up boots from Russell and Bromley.

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Plum felt hat from Feathers. Pure wool shirt. Skirt in different prints panels of pure wool. Pure wool paisley printed waistcoat lined with fake fur. All by Foale and Tuffin. Browny-plum wet look lace-up boots from Dolcis.

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Brown felt hat from Feathers. Brown Borg zip-front coat with tie belt by Marielle. Brown lace up boots by Dolcis.

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Mock hamster pull on hat from Biba. Chocolate Shetland sweater by Hogg of Hawick. Suede gauchos from Bus Stop. Mock hamster wrap over coat from Biba. Lace up boots from Dolcis. // Mock hamster pull on hat from Biba. Black crepe shirt by Poole at Shape. Mock hamster belted jacket from Biba. Black velvet gauchos from Bus Stop. Lace up boots from Dolcis.

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Mid brown Shetland sweater by Hogg of Hawick. Chocolate Borg-backed fly fronted jersey jacket with hood, cuffs and patch pockets by Weathergay. Black jersey knickerbockers with bootslace ties by Angela at London Town. Brown wet look boots by Dolcis.

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Brown panne velvet hat from Feathers. Chocolate Shetland poloneck sweater by Hogg of Hawick. Suede gaucho pants from Bus Stop. Brown striped hooded floor length wool coat lined with fur fabric by Foale and Tuffin. Belt from Bus Stop.


Wrangler, 1971

wrangler

Scanned from Honey magazine, August 1971.


Satin Goes To Blazers

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Purple satin blouse by Ann Reeves. Green satin jacket and matching green satin Oxford bags both by Sheridan Barnett for Copper Coin. Belt from Bus Stop. Rainbow brooch by Cash Graphics.

The original St Laurent satin blazer would cost you around £50, but otherwise they are available from about £10 and probably only you will know the difference. The best ones are from Bus Stop… very Joan Crawford, complete with ‘Forties’ shoulder pads. One thing’s for sure… you must have at least one in your wardrobe. They look particularly good worn over jeans and T-shirts, but if you want to look smart, wear them with matching trousers, a skirt, or over a printed dress.

Dreamy editorial which uses the brand spanking new Hard Rock Cafe on Park Lane in London as its backdrop.

Opened on 14th June 1971, by Isaac Tigrett and Peter Morton, its original decor was less memorabilia, more American-diner-transported-to-London. Sensing a gap in the market for musicians playing in London but unable to get a decent burger etc, within a decade they were expanding into the international chain it is now. The original is the only one I’ve ever visited, and it maintains a lot of its authentic charm – as long as you avoid the busy times. Oh how I wish I could time travel back to this era though.

This isn’t the first HRC-based photoshoot I have scanned, and I’m sure it won’t be the last. Its authentic-feeling interiors, much like Brighton’s seafront, seemed to lure photographers and models like moths to a flame.

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, September 1971.

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Crepe shirt by Ronnie Stirling at Stirling Cooper. Jade green satin blazer with black check (has matching pleated skirt not shown) from Mr Freedom. Panda brooch from Susan Marsh, Chelsea Antique Market.

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Blue denim hat by Titfers. Yellow satin blouse by Jeff Banks. Green satin jacket with red buttons by Sheridan Barnett for Copper Coin. Elvis brooch by Cash Graphics. Parrot brooch from a selection at Hope and Eleanor.

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Long sleeved white satin blouse with bow at neck by Ann Reeves. Single breasted red and white striped blazer by Angela at London Town. Sunglasses from Biba. Hand brooch from Hope and Eleanor.

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Blue and red printed rayon crepe dress and blue satin blazer with red buttons, both by Lee Bender at Bus Stop.

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Black rayon shirt with floral print and tie belt. Black satin double breasted blazer with self buttons and padded shoulders, both by Lee Bender at Bus Stop. Aeroplane brooch from Cash Graphics.

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Red and white spotted cotton button through dress by Lee Bender for Bus Stop. Royal blue satin blazer from Crowthers.

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Red cotton hat from Titfers. Long sleeved white rayon blouse with sail boat print by Lee Bender at Bus Stop. Double breasted blue satin blazer with red buttons by Sheridan Barnett for Copper Coin. Sunglasses from Biba.