Sentimental Journey

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Striped top and matching crepe cardigan. Cream crepe trousers, all by Jackie Ross at Jon Elliot. Clutch bag by Biba. Blue and white striped scarf from Essences. Beige straw hat by Diane Logan / Green,, white and black striped cardigan is a 19 Magazine knitting pattern. Long cream gored skirt by Brave New World. Cream strappy straw sandals from Chelsea Cobbler.

back to romance with nostalgia and nostalgic clothes in romantic settings. Long, flowing scarves, mysterious veils and soft, sensuous fabrics for Sunday strolls or super dates — a wardrobe for summer sentimentalists

Hair by Robert at Ricci Burns.

Photographed by Gian Barberis.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, May 1974.

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Green straw hat by Diane Logan. Green and cream printed crepe de chine dress by Gillian Richard. Cream knitted cardigan from Essences. Grey suede shoes from Bombacha. / Dark green chip straw ht by Diane Logan. Green and cream printed crepe de chine dress by Gillian Richard. Navy blue shoes from Bombacha.

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Cream beret by Kangol. Halter top, matching white and blue silk knitted long cardigan. Matching calf-length knitted skirt all by Lison Bonfils at Joseph. Grey suede shoes from Bombacha. / Salmon pink beret by Kangol. Cream crepe sleeveless top with sequin motif. Matching below-the-knee culottes. Both by Jackie Ross for Jon Elliot. Salmon pink silky cardigan from Essences. Sandals from Chelsea Cobbler.

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Brown felt hat from Nostalgia. Black and white crepe de chine dress by Jeff Banks. Cream cardigan by Essences. Shoes from Bombacha. / White suit with black pattern and reverse on cuffs and collar from Essences. Black suede shoes from Bombacha. Black scarf from Bus Stop.

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Pink straw hat by Diane Logan. Crepe crepe jacket and matching mid-calf skirt by Bus Stop. Cream straw shoes by Chelsea Cobbler. / Black and tan cloche from Diane Logan. V neck top and matching crepe jacket and skirt all from Bus Stop. Straw shoes by Chelsea Cobbler. Scarf to match suit from Bus Stop.

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Inspirational Images: Eyebrows – Going, going, gone

eyebrows harpers and queen december 1970 david anthony

The no-eyebrow look for the Seventies. You can achieve it, as we did here, by the use of a hair removing cream — I advise against plucking or waxing as this can permanently inhibit regrowth. Or, if you don’t want to be so drastic, you can have your brows bleached so that they are almost invisible. For the pale complexion : English Porcelain Re-Nutriv foundation with Sheer Bisque Re-Nutriv face powder; Neutraled Flesh Under Eye Primer stick ; Aurora Pink and Mint Haze Colour Contour for shaping and shading. For the eyes we used Plum Raisin and Candlelight Pink Pressed Eyelid shadows, and Black Burgundy Lash Lengthening Roll-On mascara. The lipstick is Mulberry See-Through. All by Estee Lauder. Hair style : a Marcel wave brought up to date, by Ricci Burns.

My prediction for 1971 is a swing away from the natural look and the form I believe it will take is the disappearance of eyebrows and the return to a pale, pink and white complexion. As with so many new looks in the past few years, this one has been started by models. I saw two of them, browless, this autumn in St Tropez and it gave a new and exciting perspective to the face. Beauty, like fashion, goes in cycles : after a decade of the natural look, we are due for a return to a more stylised face. The last time this occurred was in the Twenties when women achieved a very stylised type of look with pale faces, dark lips, and eyebrows plucked into pin-thin crescents. It reached its peak in the faces of Garbo, Jean Harlow and Marlene Dietrich. If, this time, it is the no-eyebrow look that catches on, it will not be the first time that brows have been removed in the cause of beauty : fashionable ladies in the 15th century covered their faces with white flour powder and accentuated the egg shape pallor of their complexions by plucking the eyebrows out completely and scraping back their hair under exaggerated head-dresses.

Beauty by Joan Price. Photographed by David Anthony.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers and Queen, December 1970


Barbershop Quintet: When the teasing had to stop

hairdressers geg germany telegraph magazine september 19th 1975 e

In the Fifties a trip to the hairdresser’s was a daunting ordeal – for you and for each hair on your head. Vidal Sassoon changed all that in 1964, and substituted the welcome breeziness of the blow-drying second-generation stylists. Who are the other top hairdresses, and who goes to them?

There are no credits for the clothes, but I think Marianne’s glorious ensemble must be a Bill Gibb, and Sian Phillips’s elegant coat looks like a John Bates to me. Such a glorious array of celebs, I think Michaeljohn win on numbers (but Ricci Burns really ought to win, purely because of the way his ladies are dressed!).

Photographed by Geg Germany.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from The Telegraph Magazine, September 19th 1975

At Ricci Burns: Marianne Faithfull, Fenella Fielding, Ricci Burns, Sian Phillips, Brenda Arnaud. Ricci started in hairdressing at the age of 15, worked for Vidal Sassoon for ten years and opened his own salon in the King's Road five years ago. Now has a second salon in George Street, and did have one in Marrakesh "until the coup, darling".

At Ricci Burns: Marianne Faithfull, Fenella Fielding, Ricci Burns, Sian Phillips, Brenda Arnaud. Ricci started in hairdressing at the age of 15, worked for Vidal Sassoon for ten years and opened his own salon in the King’s Road five years ago. Now has a second salon in George Street, and did have one in Marrakesh “until the coup, darling”.

At Vidal Sassoon: Lady Russell (back), Mary Quant, Vidal Sassoon and Kate Nelligan (centre). Shirley (Mrs Ken) Russell, Beverly Sassoon.

At Vidal Sassoon: Lady Russell (back), Mary Quant, Vidal Sassoon and Kate Nelligan (centre). Shirley (Mrs Ken) Russell, Beverly Sassoon.

At Michaeljohn: Back row, from left: Jean Muir, Britt Ekland, Joanna Lumley, Joan Collins and her daughter Sasha, Tom Gilbey, Gina Fratini and Diane Logan. Front: John Isaacs and Michael Rasser (one time colleagues at Leonard), who started Michaeljohn in 1967.

At Michaeljohn: Back row, from left: Jean Muir, Britt Ekland, Joanna Lumley, Joan Collins and her daughter Sasha, Tom Gilbey, Gina Fratini and Diane Logan. Front: John Isaacs and Michael Rasser (one time colleagues at Leonard), who started Michaeljohn in 1967.

At Figurehead: George Britnell, proprietor, with clients (from left) Catherine Parent, Kari Lai, Lady Charles Spencer Churchill, Tessa Kennedy, Lady Charlotte Anne Curzon. This is the newest salon of them all - it opened in Pont Street this year.

At Figurehead: George Britnell, proprietor, with clients (from left) Catherine Parent, Kari Lai, Lady Charles Spencer Churchill, Tessa Kennedy, Lady Charlotte Anne Curzon. This is the newest salon of them all – it opened in Pont Street this year.

At the Cadogan Club: (from left to right) Ariana Stassinopolos, Rachel Roberts, Moira Lister, Patricia Millbourn and Aldo Bigozzi (partners), Katie Boyle, Joan Benham and Annette Andre.

At the Cadogan Club: (from left to right) Ariana Stassinopolos, Rachel Roberts, Moira Lister, Patricia Millbourn and Aldo Bigozzi (partners), Katie Boyle, Joan Benham and Annette Andre.


Vintage Interiors: Thea Porter, Ricci Burns and Antony Redmile

Photographed by Tim Street-Porter. Shimmering dress, cap and necklace at Biba.

Needless to say, I desire all of these interiors but particularly Thea’s incredible mirrored dining room. Phwoar. And yes, it is also another insight into the mysterious Mr Antony Redmile – who we have met before

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Cosmopolitan, December 1974