Inspirational Images: Sheer Geniuses

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“What are Vidal Sassoon, Barbara Daly and Ossie Clark doing in Vogue studios? Vidal did the hair, Barbara the make-up, Ossie designed the dress … Lipstick matched to the flowers in Celia Birtwell’s printed chiffon. Ossie Clark twined his own gold chain and lizard over the shoulder and, snap, David Bailey. Dress to order from Ossie Clark.”

Photographed by David Bailey.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, July 1974

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Inspirational Images: Annabel Hodin in Ossie Clark

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Out on a limb… Ossie Clark as always. His new collection bristles with exclamation marks that point to Ossie the inimitable – the coat-hanger shoulders on his suits, the bright bunches-of-flowers prints by Celia Birtwell, the fluid lines and bosomy curves of his dresses.

Annabel Hodin, twenty-four years old, and a girl who believes in extremes. She changes the way she looks with the seasons, likes to be very, very brown in summer, white in winter, wears little make-up by day, lots at night. Daughter of Dr Josef Hodin the art historian, she lives in Hampstead, loves London, feels European, is at home everywhere.

Photographed by Barry McKinley at the home of Michael Chiu, owner of the Chiu Gallery. Make-up by Barbara Daly.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers and Queen, February 1973

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The Tight-Ass Suit

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Suit by Lee Bender at Bus Stop. Belt by Chris Trill. Shoes from Midas.

“Start squaring your shoulders, tightening your belt and walking on four-inch heels…”

A phenomenal editorial which feels very ahead of its time. This is really the birth of ‘Power Dressing’, from February 1979. There’s a curious juxtaposition of old and new, the old telephone and boudoir chair in the final photo suggest the origins of these suits in the Forties while the clunky ‘mobile phone’ is the signpost to the unknown future. Pre-Eighties and pre-Thatcher (just) – even pre-Miss Peelpants (also, just!) – there’s something quite charming about the modest silhouette here – which is really rather hard to equate with the horrors which were to come. These feel more in line with the New Romantic and Goth garments from the 1980s which I feel passionate about and choose to collect (like Sarah Whitworth, Symphony of Shadows etc), than with Yuppies and Dynasty, although you can just as equally see their genesis here.

Photographed by Christa Peters. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Cosmpolitan, February 1979.

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Suit by Wallis. Silk camisole by Tatters. Shoes from Pancaldi.

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Jute tweed suit by Strawberry Studio. Bag by Butler and Wilson. Shoes from Russell & Bromley.

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Cotton cord suit by Howie Diffusion. Camisole from Tatters. Belt by Courtney Reed. Shoes from Pancaldi.

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Three piece suit by Daily Blue. Shirt by Riva. Purse and shoes by Pancaldi.

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Suit by Stephen Marks. Shirt by Pamela Frances. Belt by Courtney Reed. Shoes from Pancaldi.

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Wool crepe suit by Jaeger. Shoes by Pancaldi.

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Suit with the wiest shoulders and narrowest skirt by Strawberry Studio. Suede shoes by Sacha.


Inspirational Images: Your health too, Mr Bottomley

Nova, February 1972

One of my favourite images from a Vargas-inspired spread in Nova, photographed by Hans Feurer. I will scan the others in time, but they all deserve solo appreciation. I think I would actually give my firstborn for those Chelsea Cobbler shoes. Red leather AND stars? Fetch my smelling salts!

I’ve said it before, and I will say it again, there is something about the Seventies take on Forties style (and particularly pin-ups) which I find infinitely more appealing than the originals or the tired current trend for such things.

It takes all the glamour and sauce, but gives it that subversive, pop art-esque treatment so typical of designers like Tommy Roberts, Terry de Havilland and Rae Spencer-Cullen for Miss Mouse (amongst so many other Vintage-a-Peel favourites). The models look quirky, confident and very knowing; I never get a sense of exploitation or submission. Even the tagline ‘exploitation can be fun’ is perfectly pitched and mocking both the exploiters and the prudes. Viva la Seventies!


The most nostalgic clothes of all…

Rosalind Russell wore this soft grey georgette evening dress with cross-draped bodice, for The Velvet Touch.

[Proving that nostalgia is nothing new…]

You are forgiven if you think the pictures on these pages are fashion circa 1971. In a sense, they are; but in fact, these are original Hollywood – the clothes of the stars, people like Bette Davis, Katherine Hepburn, Olivia de Havilland, Jean Seberg, Shirley Temple — worn in their films, coming up for a gala auction at Sotheby’s Pantechnicon in Motcomb Street at 7pm on December 1.

The man who made it possible is Michael Fish — Mr Fish, no less — who bought the whole collection of 30s, 40s and 50s creations from Max Berman & Son of Hollywood, and is putting them to auction in aid of Immigrant Community Services. So you could help to provide a new children’s playground in Brixton, say, while treating yourself to a great fashion original . . . like Jane Russell’s navy pleated chiffon coat over crepe culottes ; Bonita Granville’s pink chiffon dress with Alencon lace and fine pleating; not to mention the original mini worn by Betty Hutton in Annie Get Your Gun. 

Patrick Procktor is contributing to the programme for Mr Fish’s ‘frock fantasy’. Ossie Clark’s sensational model, Gala, will wear some of the clothes, as she did for us in company with Barbara Trentham. Make-up here by Barbara Daly; hair by Smile; location, Mr Paul Hamlyn’s house. 

Harpers and Queen, December 1971. Photographs by Tim Street-Porter

Square-shouldered 40s suits, as worn by Maureen O’Hara and Ginger Rogers.

Agnes Moorehead starred in this vampy black crepe dress with sequins and a matching shoulder cape fastened with jet.


Inspirational Images: Pre-Raphaelite hair

 
Photographed by Barry Lategan. Hair by John at Leonard. Make-up by Barbara Daly.
Vogue, February 1975