Linda Thorson for Belle Color

linda thorson belle colour

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, April 1969.

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The Evening After Summer’s End

guy bourdin vogue october 1969

Turban £50, skull cap £6, at Thea Porter. Pearls, Paris House. Blouse by John Bates for Jean Varon

Photographed by Guy Bourdin.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, October 1969.


Take a long look

take a long look 3

Long blue coat, £25 4s. by Ossie Clark at Quorum, S.W.3. Scarf by Liberty, £3 19s. 6d. White boots by Sacha, £7 7s. Flowery print dress, £10 10s,, by Kleptomania, S.W.3. Blue boots by Sacha, £7 7s. Corocraft beads, £1 12s. 6d.

How far are you dropping your hem this season? Variations on the theme fall from just below the knee to maxi. Coolest long-liners come soft on jersey, hot on tweed, close and clingy in crepe and warm in wool and fur…

Photographed by David Hurn.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Petticoat, October 1969.

take a long look 1

Blue button-front long dress, £8 Ss. from main Wallis Shops. Beige long-sleeved shirt, £3 13s. 6d., turquoise coat, £13 13s., long black skirt, £5 Ss. all from Bus Stop, W.8. Worry beads, £15s. from The Greek Shop.

take a long look 2

Maroon herring-bone coat, £18 10s., with matching trousers, £5 by Elgee from Miss Selfridge. Ravel red patent brogues, £6 6s, Lilac velveteen shirt by John Craig, £3 12s. from Stop the Shop, S.W.3. Brown and white tweed coat, £16 10s. C & A. Paisley scarf by Richard Allan, £3 3s. Grey herringbone coat, £13 2s. 6d., matching trousers, £414s. 6d., from Bus Stop, W.B. and the new shop in Birmingham. Boots by Sacha, £7 7s. Fringed scarf by Sujon, £3 13s. 6d.


Boring Party

Boring Party

If the invitation is really dread and you feel a creeping paralysis of boredom days ahead, there are only — two ways out. One is to behave so badly that you are never asked again; the other is to look so outrageously glamorous that you rivet the attention of every man in the room. Revive nostalgia for the unattainable Hollywood style, in a luscious apricot satin evening dress, correct with every Forties detail — sweetheart neckline, wedding dress, buttons, even an artificial flower on the shoulder. By Bus Stop, about 89s:6d. Rippling Rita Hayworth hairstyle by Hugh at Cheveux, W.S.

Photographed by David Stanford.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, December 1968.


All That Glitters

All That Glitters 3

Bitter choc lurex suit by Pourelle, 13gns. Cat suit with fine straps by Pourelle, 12gns. Shoes by Dolcis, 89s 11d

Out of the sombre tones of last year’s black evening dress, emerges the exciting new glitter story for autumn. Light-as-a-feather Lurex, made up into cool, clinging styles, helps you shimmer through those soft, romantic evenings.

Photographed by Stuart Brown in the flat belonging to interior designer John Wright of Walker, Wright and Schofield, and also in Mr Chow’s restaurant.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, September 1969.

All That Glitters 4

Pink silver-sequined georgette dress by Gillian Richard, 11gns.

 

All That Glitters 2

Gold lurex jumpsuit by Pourelle, 13gns. Gold lurex dress and trousers by Pourelle, 13gns. Shoes from Russell and Bromley, £8 9s.

 

All That Glitters 5

Bitter choc lurex long sleeved dress by Pourelle, 9½gns. Black shoes by Elliott, 7gns.

 

All That Glitters 1

Silver lurex shirt dress worn over matching trousers by Pourelle, 13gns. Silver shoes by Russell and Bromley, 7gns.

 

All That Glitters 8

Silver lurex evening suit by Pourelle, 15gns. Silver shoes by Russell and Bromley, £8 19s.

 

All That Glitters 6

Bitter choc Lurex dress by Pourelle, 7½gns.

 

All That Glitters 7

Black sequined georgette dress by Gillian Richard, 8gns.

 

 


Mother Wouldn’t Like It

Mother Wouldn't Like It

Have just formed a new organisation. It’s called SPOCC or the Society for the Protection of Clothes Customers. Idea came last night when I collected a couple of suits from the cleaners, only to find that the shoulder padding of one jacket was lost somewhere down the sleeve, and the trousers, supposed to be drip dry, were wrinkled like a Dutch dyke. The first suit came from Carnaby Street, the second from the Kings Road. Jose, my flat-mate, tried to pacify me by saying, “I thought you said clothes now are fashionable and short-lived. So what do you expect?” Simply that a suit shouldn’t disappear at the first clean! I accept built-in obsolescence and all those rubbishy excuses for using cheap materials, but I expect a suit to last a year, not a month. How about you? Let me know what you think … it might add up to some interesting revelations. Like the super trousers in the sketch. They’re Newman jeans from France; they cost much more than English or American but, in my view, are twice as good. I got a pair from the Heavy Metal Kids in the Kensington Market for £5. Elsewhere you can pay up to 8 gns. Shirts are another racket. The shirt here looks as if it costs 10 gns., and so it can at some places. In fact, it’s made by a man called Bryan King, who works in a Queensway attic, turning out great shirts handmade, frilled, tapered, for £2—£4, and sells them at his stall, Mother Wouldn’t Like It, also in the Ken Market. The tie-makers have become so ridiculously expensive that ties are out except for the odd occasion, and these shirts are as logical a take-over as the polo sweater. If Bryan can turn them out at this price, why can’t others? Remember—next time you think you’ve been rooked, let Luke SPOCC Jarvis know.

Written by Luke Jarvis.

Illustration by Wendy Buttrose.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Honey, March 1968.


I see the gypsy in your soul

honey20alan20aldridge20small

Illustration by Alan Aldridge.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Honey, July 1968.