Inspirational Images: Mia Farrow by Snowdon

mia farrow by snowdon

The girl they picked to play Daisy

Dress from Essenses. Ropes of pearl, crystal , peach and turquoise beads, bangles from a selection at The Purple Shop.

Photographed by Snowdon. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, March 1973

mia farrow by snowdon 2

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We are not the first, and we will not be the last…

I think it is safe to say that I love old clothes. I dream them, I live in them and I covet the ones I don’t have. But I am under no illusion that there is anything inherently unique or radical about this. The uniqueness comes from the impression of your personality in whatever you choose to wear. The fabrics, the colours, the shapes, these are the expression of my inner self in one, superficially superficial, way.

It is important to remember this: each generation thinks it invented sex, and I fear the same goes for ‘vintage’ clothing. This article makes for fascinatingly familiar reading. Commercialisation is the death knell each time, but in turn becomes the coveted piece of history for the next generation of disillusioned people (see the mention of Catherine Buckley’s old jacquard fabrics in the text of the article. My Buckley skirt is one of these pieces). The irony does not escape me; I wear clothes by Ossie Clark, Biba, Bus Stop… all of who were creating clothes heavily inspired by their own childhoods.

Just wanting a period look is not the important part, anyone can buy a reproduction and plenty of people will, the expression comes from the colours, fabrics, shapes and accoutrements you pick. There is absolutely nothing wrong with new clothing taking influence from old, although my thoughts on direct duplication are well known, but why would you limit yourself to the prints they have chosen this season? There are limitless possibilities when you look around you and take inspiration from a variety of sources other than from conventional fashion magazines or ‘how to’ guides.

That is partly the aim of this blog, and I hope to continue in such a vein for a long time yet…

The Cosmo Girl’s Guide to the Cast-Offs Cult… Cosmopolitan, August 1974.


Inspirational Images: Value Added Fashion

Everyone is looking back in nostalgia – especially in fashion. But authentic Twenties and Thirties clothes can be expensive to buy so sew your own and save money. Use crêpe de chine and bias-cut voiles and leave out the linings for an authentic swing and flair. Choose eau de Nil, bois de rose and the pale sorbet shades for pure, undiluted nostalgia.

Cosmopolitan magazine, June 1974. Photos by Rolph Gobits. Scanned by Miss Peelpants.



Inspirational Illustrations: What You’ll Be Into

Illustration by Michael Roberts. 19 Magazine, January 1973.

. . . in 1973. Life is beautiful, the girls are beautiful, the clothes are beautiful. In fact, life, 1973-style, is a cabaret and here we present the cabaret-girls, with a few tips – picked up at the Paris fashion shows – on how to dress the part without using up too much money 

LEFT TO RIGHT: Martine in a chemise dress inspired by Roland Chakkal at Mendes. Make one yourself from a ‘Twenties‘ slip. She amuses herself by.toying with her cigarette holder (held just for show), while listening to the jangling of her nine A bangles. Her drop-earrings glitter, her tight bead choker sparkles and one arm is snug in its elbow-length glove. 

Janine tangos giddily with her partner. but nevertheless looks chic in a little soup-plate hat, perched jauntily over a printed scarf inspired by Karl Lagerfeld at Chloe. Thrown into a state of ecstasy by the Jap Collection, she has naturally teamed a long striped jumper with a neat box-pleated skirt.

Her partner, in pinstriped suit (inspired by designer Dorothée Bis), white-wing collar and bow tie (available in father`s top drawer), wears drop-earrings as a concession to femininity. 

Neatly fandangoing into the spotlight – Katherine and Margaret. Katherine’s favourite designer is Karl Lagerfeld at Chloe. How right then for her to be attired in printed bra top and skirt. But paradox, paradox. She also fell in love with the stripey pixie hat seen at Dorothee Bis. Happily, she’s thrown caution to the wind and wears them together. 

Margaret looks soulful. That is the only way one can look in an eye-shading, pull-on hat, all the rage for lovers of designer Emmanuelle Khanh

Zizi, as always, simply had to be different. A monocle. Only she could get away with this, but the rest of her accessories should be simple to copy.