Go to a party

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Wonderful in white… snowy crepe, sleeves long and ringed with Irish thread work. By John Bates at Jean Varon. Jewellery by Adrien Mann. Man’s shirt to order from Thea Porter.

Photographed by Paul Orssich.

Scanned from Vanity Fair, November 1968.

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Glamorously Grecian… pure white crepe, beautifully braided. By Young Ideas at Rhona Roy. Jewellery by Adrien Mann. Man’s black braided suit is from Just Men.

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Beautiful in black seductive plunging rayon jersey. By Foale and Tuffin. Jewellery by Adrien Mann. Shoes by Lilley and Skinner. Man’s evening suit and shirt all from Take 6.

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Stunning in satin… timeless dress as bewitching as a glimmer of midnight. By Bernard Freres. Man’s velvet jacket from Take 6. Man’s be-ruffled shirt from Kleptomania.

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Perfect in pink… sugared almond crepe falling soft to the wrist and waist. Designed by Anne Tyrrell at John Marks. Jewellery by Adrien Mann. Man’s red velvet jacket and silk scarf from Trend at Simpson.

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Reassured in red. Skimmy shaped wool crepe party-goer cut away at the shoulders. By Sujon. Jewellery by Adrien Mann. Man’s evening suit and polo shirt both from Club 92.

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Just Like Granny Used To Wear

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Very Thirtyish, with its floral print and elbow length sleeves, a Liberty print cotton dress by Foale and Tuffin. Leather shoes by Ravel. Crochet straw hat by Biba.

Granny’s clothes are coming back. Trend-setting girls saw some time ago what pinched-in waists and long clinging crepes could do for them. Now manufacturers and boutiques have seen the potential. But beware – for it is only on the very young that granny’s clothes look very new.

Hair by Howard at Vidal Sassoon. Make-up by Yardley. Fashion by June McCallum.

Photographed by Hiroshi.

Scanned from The Telegraph Magazine, August 7th 1970.

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Small white flowers are printed on the black background of a cotton jersey dress that granny might have worn as a girl. Designed by Lee Bender at Bus Stop. The shiny leather lace-up shoes are by Ravel.

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Far from looking old-fashioned, this printed cotton suit from Biba is beautifully up-to-date with its fitted waist, peplum and long skirt. the lace-up granny boots are from Ravel.

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Double chiffon dress for serious occasions has the dropped waistline, sash and long sleeves with scalloped trim of the Twenties. By Mary Quant’s Ginger Group.

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Printed crepe suit with a fitted shape that is a reminder of the Forties. By Lee Bender at Bus Stop. Shoes are from Ravel.


A Moonlight Flit

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Floppy Treebark crepe trouser suit with wide straight trousers, waist sash and large frilled collar, by Foale and Tuffin.

Run barefoot through the grass or dance under the stars. Shades of Isadora Duncan* and free, flowing movement. Long, lithe limbs leaping through loose chiffon. Wild intensity in dramatic falls of fabric. The romance of long dresses, of floating frills in transparent fabrics is yours for the asking. Come, do a moonlight flit with us…. *Isadora Duncan. who moved in high society, and whose dancing shook Edwardian England, initiated free dance movement clad in clothes which emphasised her point. We can still thank her for the romantic-looking, drifting dresses inspired by the film revival of her life story — on release in the Autumn, starring Vanessa Redgrave.

Photographed by Al Vandenburg. Hairstyles by Derek Roe.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, August 1968.

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Dress in yellow embroidered voile by Biba.

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Transparent black and white spotted dress from Biba. Shoes by Ronald Keith.

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Tight waist-skimming jacket and knee length skirt in yellow crepe by Foale and Tuffin. Orange shoes by Elliotts.

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Flocked yellow full-skirted Dacron dress by Shelana.

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Romantic white lawn dress by Gina Fratini.  Silver shoes by Dolcis.


Clothes to Have a Fight In

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Black gabardine raincoat by Foale and Tuffin. Black suede double strapped boots from Russell & Bromley. Rainbow striped sweater by Stirling Cooper.

Reasons why Vanity Fair is one of the best fashion magazines ever #29847: A fashion editorial inspired by a fighting couple, photographed by Saul Leiter…

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, January 1971.

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Maroon jersey coat and plaid skirt by Stirling Cooper. Sweater by Sonia Rykiel for Browns. Boots by Elliott’s.

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Brown beige and orange flecked wool gauchos worn with thick brown shetland sweater, leather studded belt and appliqued bag all from Feathers. Cap from Way In.

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Brown and beige tweed suit with Borg trims by Mansfield. Floppy woolly hat from Browns. Brown suede shoes by Pedro Garcia for Jack Hinton.

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Midi skirt and matching muffler by Maxwell Croft. Brown polo necked sweater by Sonia Rykiel from Browns. Dark brown leather boots by Chelsea Cobbler.


Come Up and See Me Sometime

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FRONT: Granny vest-slip in pink rayon stockinette, by Walker Reid, 11s. 6d.; Persian love-ring by Corocraft, 7s. 6d.; opera-length pearl strand by Corocraft, 9s. 6d.; hairslide from a selection by Adrien Mann. LEFT TO RIGHT: Art Nouveau print slip in chocolate and black by Biba, 28s. 6d. Southern-belle lace-trimmed dressing gown by Angela Gore, 15 gns.; satin bra by Emmanuelle Khanh, 89s. 6d.; little boy boxer shorts by Etam, 5s. 11d.; silver buckle bracelet by Corocraft, 31s. 6d. Black satin smoking jacket with gold facings by Bus Stop, approx. 5 gns.; see-thru tulle bra by Emmanuelle Khanh, 55s.; black oval ring by Adrien Mann, 22s. 6d. Baby blue nylon nightie with high gathered waist at Separates Centre, 22s. 6d.; silver bracelet by Maxine Northwood, 35s. Black jersey-crêpe dressy-coat with spotted cummerbund sash and cuffs by Foale & Tuffin, 131 gns.; jet strand necklace at Fenwick’s, 21s.

… I’m always at home … it’s such a bore going out when there are such fabulous slink-at-home clothes … well, I mean … who wants to get oyster-satin wet? I’ll just cuddle up in a clutch-close wrap in front of the fire… and sling on a few jewels, and how’s about it, pal-sie ? See you soon soon…

Illustrated by Philip Castle.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Honey Magazine, November 1968.

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LEFT TO RIGHT: Taj Mahal print hall-slip by Warners. 23s. lid.: relax-line bra by Lovable. 9s. 11d.: strands of jet beads by Fenwicks, 21s. each. Play-around coat•dress in pink satin by Bus Stop. 89s. 6d.; jewelled cross brooch by Paul Stephens. 15s.60. Sail-away lounging pyjamas in white rayon jersey by Foale & Tuffin. 12gns.; Maltese cross by Corocraft, 37s. 6d: black oval ring by Adrian Mann. 22s. 6d.: wide silver bracelet by Adrian Mann, 57s. 6d. Velvet print lounging gown with satin trim by Angela Gore. 12 gns. Jean Harlow nightie with pin-tucked bodice in powder blue by Walker Reid, 43s. 6d. At Home gown in oyster satin, 96s. 2d.; matching bra, 41s. 10d.: matching little•boy pants, 51s. 4d. All by Alice Pollock FRONT: Casual nothing while stretch lace bra by Biba. 21s.: white stretch lace bikini pants by Etam, 4s.11d.; oval hair slide from Harrod’s Way In. 7s.60.: hoop ear-rings by Corocraft, 15s. 6d.; armful of narrow gilt bangles by Paul Stephens. 27s. 6d. each.


Happily Ever After

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White lawn dress printed with butterflies and flowers by Thea Porter. Straw hat by Buckle Under. Red wedge shoes by Kurt Geiger. Belt by Shape.

There’s a good reason why Vanity Fair is possibly my favourite magazine of this period. They were relatively conventional in the 1960s, and would ‘merge’ with Honey magazine around 1972, but in their death knells they were just about the most innovative magazine in the UK. Issues were often themed around ‘issues’, for example this one is entirely themed around break-ups and divorces (including a story on what a divorced man should wear when taking his kid out for the day).

Nor did they shy away from more expensive designer names, such as Thea Porter and Zandra Rhodes here, mixing them happily with the more affordable but still iconic boutique names like Stirling Cooper and Mr Freedom. Adding Foale and Tuffin, Pablo and Delia and Terry de Havilland into the mix for good measure, and all those stunning illustrations by Michael Foreman… this is one of my favourite editorials of all time.

Vanity Fair is also, frankly, a nightmare to scan because it falls apart at the binding with the lightest touch, which is why I don’t scan them as often. So enjoy the heaven of Harri Peccinotti’s work while I gently shuffle all the pages back into the magazine…

Photographed by Harri Peccinotti.

Illustrations by Michael Foreman.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, April 1971.

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Long grey crepe dress patterned with purple, green and red birds by Shape. Pablo and Delia suede thong necklace. Blue suede shoes at Sacha.

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Beige suede skirt with applique shapes and matching shawl by Mary Quant. Necklace from Buckle Under. Beige suede boots by Guy Humphries.

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Blue and white feather printed chiffon dress by Zandra Rhodes.

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Left to right: Chiffon blouse and multi-coloured skirt by Foale and Tuffin. Painted rainbow shoes from Mr Freedom. Painted belt by Shape. // Cream and red jersey catsuit (top only showing) and banded red and cream skirt both from Stirling Cooper. Red shoes by Kurt Geiger. // Cream, yellow and red jersey dress by Stirling Cooper. Pull on hat by Janice Peskett. // Red cotton t-shirt by Erica Budd. Cream dungarees from Stirling Cooper. Red python sandals at Elliotts.

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Above: Mauve satin cotton pinafore dress and blouse by Gladrags. Right: Bottom half of Alistair Cowin calico trousers with green printing. Green and yellow shoes by Terry de Havilland. Far right: Black velvet dungarees with white satin applique heart from Mr Freedom. Chiffon blouse from Foale and Tuffin. Mauve canvas boots at Charles Jourdan.


Inspirational Editorials: Take Cover

take cover - vanity fair - november 1968 - david stafford - foale tuffin

Warm and cuddly coat to brave a winter’s night. Belted and snug double-breasted fur fabric maxi-style to wear over anything except gala gear. Great with trousers. Foale and Tuffin, 18gns long or 16gns short. Long white kid boots by Anello and Davide, 12gns.

Nothing is more depressing than dolling yourself up to the nines – and putting an everyday coat over your party hear. Mink stoles are too ageing for words and short coats over long dresses look awful.

Photographed by David Stanford.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vanity Fair, November 1968.

take cover - vanity fair - november 1968 - david stafford - biba

If you go out a lot and wear long or short evening dresses or lots of trouser suits, a full-length velvet coat looks marvellously dramatic. This one in scarlet or black has a great romantic collar and elegant arum lily sleeves. At Biba, 8gns. Knitted dress by Jean Allen.