If All The World Were Summer

Far left: White cotton sailor shirt from Medusa. Tomato and white gingham dirndl by Just Jane. Panama hat by Buckle Under. Near left: Grass green and white gingham shirt over full green and red gingham skirt by Stirling Cooper. Straw hat from Crowthers. Men’s cream shirts throughout by Jeff Banks.

…Then dressing’s a picnic. All these nice new laundered clothes and country girls from Colette stories out in the green fields under blue Provençal skies, with wine and fruit and flowers.

Photographed by Jonvelle.

Scanned from Vogue, July 1971

Creamy cheesecloth smock and skirt by Amir Scorpio. Hat by Buckle Under.
Smock of field plains, flower or spot prints, ruched and loose over bias skirt of buttercup crepe de chine at Universal Witness. Black straw hat from a range at Van der Fransen.
Near right: Flowering crepe de chine blouse by Sujon. Fully gathered emerald cotton skirt by Just Jane. Straw hat from Buckle Under. Far right: Black and red and brilliant Liberty mixtures gathered in frills and flounces by Foale and Tuffin. Flower and suede belts by Buckle Under.
Sky cotton blouse with red buttons, red stitching and long blue skirt by Sujon. Blue suede belt by Buckle Under. Black hat from Van der Fransen.
Cotton lawn smock in primary patches by Foale and Tuffin. Panama by Buckle Under. Clogs from Biba.
Advertisements

Razzmatadvertising (Part I)

Slippery satin cherry-printed drainpipes by Alkasura. Acid green cotton jersey t-shirt by Janine Designs at Harold Ingram. Conker choker by Adrien Mann. Leather belt by Biba.

This post is brought to you in two parts. The editorial was, unusually, photographed by two different photographers in two different locations. Tomorrow I will post the photos from Brighton Pier (very exciting for me, as you can guess!). Today’s were photographed in Meeny’s, which was a King’s Road boutique started by Gary Craze in 1972 – specialising in American brands for both adults and children. Clearly showing the same influences as Mr Freedom, this is the first I’ve seen of the interior. The clothes are the very creme de la creme of boutique ‘pop art’ joyfulness.

Photographed by Dick Polak.

Scanned from Honey, May 1973.

Desert island printed dungarees by Richard Green. Gitanes printed jersey t-shirt by Marshall Lester. Crochet cloche by Emmerton and Lambert. Spotted kerchief by Meeny’s.
Rock’n’roll printed skirt and bolero jacket and sun top all by Miss Mouse. Conker choker by Adrien Mann.
Hawaiian surfing printed cotton shirt from Joanna’s Fleamarket
Camel printed cotton t-shirt by Marshall Lester. Belt by Biba
Hawaiian printed cricket vest by Jap at Joseph. Red vest by Outlander.
Slogan printed cotton coated PVC aprons by Sari Fabrics from all branches of Habitat, DH Evans and Selfridges. Satin pencil skirts by Alkasura.

Show a Little Spirit

Metallic leather battle jackets by Fifth Avenue. Green jacket worn with black crepe trousers by Gordon King. Lilac jacket worn with black crepe trousers by Highlight. Aldbrook scarf.

Bewitch: Try a bit of witchcraft, a bit of magical charm. Cast a spell or two with slinky black velvet, bedecked with sequins. Or glamorise in shiny coloured satins. But if you are going to bewitch you must…

Bother: to wear the same startling accessories. Wear strings of shiny necklaces, an interesting belt or sash. Tie a scarf the gipsy way, around your hips or head. For maximum effect shine your face with gold or silver powder.

And be wilder: in everything you wear.

Fashion by Sue Hone. Modelled by Madeline Smith and unknown model.

Photographed by Vic Singh

Scanned from Petticoat, November 2nd 1968.

Bright yellow satin trouser suit by Kleptomania. Ronald Keith patent shoes. Shimmering black battle-dress jacket and trousers by Bus Stop. Mauve and yellow belt by Martha Hill. Mauve lace scarf by Browns. Lilley and Skinner shoes.
Spooky black outfit by Bus Stop. Red crepe shirt and silk scarf by Biba.
Little black velvet dress by Biba. Sequined waistcoat by Gordon King. Indian pendant by Kleptomania.
Black crepe dress by Marlborough. Indian silk scarf by Aldbrook. Black waistcoat and skirt by Shelana. Blue shirt by Ivor Wahl.



The Girls in the Band: A New Look for Cabaret

The Moodies – a group of art students who started the parody the current obsession with nostalgia, then found themselves being taken seriously

The numbers that The Moodies perform are firmly anchored in the Fifties and Sixties and ignore the current pop obsessions for necrophilia, drugs, suicide and the like. But under their bizarre make-up they are entertainers of the Seventies, rather than a group of decadent kids living off the nostalgia for ‘golden oldies’. On a good night, when the audience is firmly on their side, they create an atmosphere more like that of a private party than a sterile public performance; they earn their laughs through the juxtaposition of songs, their eccentric make-up, their idiotic props and their energetic dancing.

About a month ago, when they were playing at the tiny Moderna Theatre in Munich’s Schwabing district (surely the cleanest ‘quarter’ in the world), we noticed that the audience of all ages, shapes and sizes, were neatly dressed to the last man and woman; even their jeans had the knife-edge creases of an expensive boutique — the complete opposite of the people they had come to watch, who were described recently in Time Out as “looking like half a dozen friendly whores after a hard night in the Reeperbahn”.

“Everyone here tries to get us to mend our sweaters, they feel sorry for us. They think a hole is a sign of poverty. They wear the gear but they don’t understand what it’s about.

Perhaps that’s why we appeal to them,” said Anne Bean, who is a deceptively homely-looking girl off-stage and a powerhouse of energy on. She is one of the leaders of the group, though she denied that anyone actually led : “We are totally democratic -not that there is such a thing.” All art students at Reading, it was the second time they had played Munich. They banded together to play professional dates after they had sat their finals; they all passed except for buxom Suzy Adderley, who is on one year’s leave of absence and goes back soon to complete her course. They tried their luck at the Edinburgh Festival along with the rest of the Fringe: this was successful enough to land them their first book-ing in Munich.

“Actually, we were offered an Arts Council grant but we turned it down as we thought that it might restrict us,” said Rod Melvin, the pianist and the only man in the group. They still don’t have a pro-ducer, director, manager or agent. The only non-performing person to travel with them is Mickey Ekers who is a stage-manager-cum-electrician-cum-prop-master.

In the early days there were six girls, Anne Bean, Marianne Holliday, Polly Eltes, Suzy Adderley, Annie Sloan and Becky Bailey, but Becky Bailey deserted the group to paint. Anne Bean explained: “We really did the show as part of our finals.” Did this help them pass ? “Quite the contrary. It nearly sank us.”

At the start they followed the traditions of what was happening in pop music at that time: “Even the names we chose were just send-ups of those currently fashionable girlie groups like Lulu and the Luvvers and Martha and the Vandellas” said Anne Bean. “At one time we called ourselves Frank and the Furters” (she looked suitably ashamed) “then Lulu and the Lesbians, then prior to becoming The Mooches we were The Menstrual Seven.”

Before returning to Munich they had been playing at the Theatre at New End, Hampstead, where they had become quite a cult with late-night audiences. The group do num-bers like Gingold’s and Chevalier’s duet Ah Yes, I Remember It Well from Gigi and some of the more aggressive Presley songs, but they interpret these rather than imitate the originals. They make no announcements and use no words in spite of ‘gag fur gag’ written on the pink stars advertising the show. And they are very funny. Thank You For Being An Angel sung with melancholic grace by Rod Melvin became farce as the angel who drifted around stage shedding sequins at every step turned out to be a cross between Mae West and Jayne Mansfield. (Melvin is a talented pianist; the rest of the group are not musicians, but rely instead on improvisation and innovation.)

The make-up is startling. Polly Eltes said: “I really don’t quite know how we arrived at this present look. We started off quite simply looking brown and rather natural with perhaps blue eyelids, but gradually we progressed to what you see now.” They wear water-based wet-white foundation and then draw their features on to these masks. Anne Bean takes it the furthest by banding strips of coloured feathers to her eyebrows, while Rod Melvin, with his great carmine mouth and black sad eyes, looks somewhere between a clown and a Kabuki artist.

“I suppose we do reflect fashions, but I think it’s quite unconscious,” said Annie Sloan. “When Germaine Greer’s book came out (The Female Eunuch) we all wore strict little mannish suits, but somehow we have come to this.” ‘This’ is fishnet tights (with holes), gold-painted lace-up boots, long gloves and clothes they say they make themselves (which no-one would challenge). During the performance they swap clothes so that they look different but don’t use more costumes.

“I suppose that what we wear might seem eccentric and exaggerated; everyone marvels at Rod’s shoes but they came from Dolcis and mine came from Biba’s, so we are only picking up what’s around.” They admit that their art training and observations have probably influenced their act — the masks they wear at one point are exactly like those shown on some of John Davies’s sculptures shown at the Whitechapel Gallery a couple of years ago : “But we don’t want to intellectualise what we do,” said Annie Sloan, “or we might become self-conscious and unable to perform.”

The group pool their money; so much goes on running expenses, the rest on food and necessities. They were scheduled for seven more weeks on the road, ending at the Schiller Theatre in East Berlin. “When we are out of work we all do other things. I model, though I’m not much good at it,” said Polly Ekes. “I can’t really take it seriously, so when I go for jobs I mostly get turned down.” Rod and Anne teach, and sometimes Rod plays the piano for a girl singer and Marianne does typography and pho-tography. It is doubtful whether they will stick together : one has the feeling that they are enthusiastically filling in time before they move on to some-thing else.

Photographed by Hans Feurer. Report by Meriel McCooey.

Scanned from The Sunday Times Magazine, June 23rd 1974


The Spirit of Christmas

Silk lace dress with boxer shorts underneath by Poole at Shape. Shoes by Biba. Choker and fake violets from John Lewis.

Rich renaissance colours in velvet, lace and crepe reflect the mood for Christmas. Emphasis is on the shape of the body – necklines plunge, backs are bared, and skirts are slit in a demure, but wanton, fashion.

Photographed by John Bishop.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, December 1970.

Crepe dress in black, mauve and green by Alistair Cowin. Shoes from Biba.
Plum silk lace wrap over blouse with matching waist ties by Poole at Shape. Gored skirt in deep green velvet by Foale and Tuffin. Shoes from Biba.
Charcoal green dress and crepe shoes all from Biba.
Velvet cap from Feathers. Veiling from John Lewis. Crepe dress by Stirling Cooper. Shoes from Elliott.
Lilac velvet cap from Feathers. Blue Tricel wrap over top and flared skirt both by Poole at Shape. Shoes from Biba.
Brown, beige and rust panne velvet dress by Gillian Richard. Black shoes by Elliott.



Let’s Make Up

Lets Make Up - John Bishop - 19 December 70

Katrine on the left, is our Biba model… Louise on the right is our Mary Quant model… Both chokers from Biba. Hair for both girls was by Didier from the Jean Louis Davide Salon, Paris. Make-up was devised by top French visagiste, Clement and photographed in Paris by John Bishop.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, December 1970.


The Great Coats

great coats 1

Black panne velvet hat from Feathers. Exotic black floor length beaver-look Borg fur fabric coat by Ossie Clark at Quorum.

The title of this editorial reminds me of being in Dublin earlier this year. Just arrived, walking along trying to find our hotel, I was wearing a Seventies brown nappa leather trench coat (it was February and freezing). A girl strode past and without pausing to wait for a reaction or looking me in the eye she just said ‘Great coat’ and carried on walking. I decided I loved Dublin right there and then.

This spread features the stunning Charlotte Martin and was photographed in Austria. I’m still in love with my brown leather trench coat but I wouldn’t say no if any of these coats (particularly that Quorum stunner above) were to land in my lap this winter…

Photographed by John Bishop.

Scanned from 19 Magazine, December 1970.

great coats 2

Black panne velvet hat by Feathers. Long chocolate jersey top with tight buttoned cuffs. Grey and rust mock Gonk shoulder cape. Both from Biba.

great coats 3

Hat from Feathers. Dark brown and black Forties-style mock chipmunk jacket with self tie belt. Black wool pants with turn ups. Both from Biba. Wet-look boots from Dolcis.

great coats 4

Plum Borg-lined jacket with leather elbow patches and trimmings by Daniel Hechter of Paris. Green barathea midi skirt by Gladrags. Tan leather leace up boots from Russell and Bromley.

great coats 5

Plum felt hat from Feathers. Pure wool shirt. Skirt in different prints panels of pure wool. Pure wool paisley printed waistcoat lined with fake fur. All by Foale and Tuffin. Browny-plum wet look lace-up boots from Dolcis.

great coats 6

Brown felt hat from Feathers. Brown Borg zip-front coat with tie belt by Marielle. Brown lace up boots by Dolcis.

great coats 7

Mock hamster pull on hat from Biba. Chocolate Shetland sweater by Hogg of Hawick. Suede gauchos from Bus Stop. Mock hamster wrap over coat from Biba. Lace up boots from Dolcis. // Mock hamster pull on hat from Biba. Black crepe shirt by Poole at Shape. Mock hamster belted jacket from Biba. Black velvet gauchos from Bus Stop. Lace up boots from Dolcis.

great coats 8

Mid brown Shetland sweater by Hogg of Hawick. Chocolate Borg-backed fly fronted jersey jacket with hood, cuffs and patch pockets by Weathergay. Black jersey knickerbockers with bootslace ties by Angela at London Town. Brown wet look boots by Dolcis.

great coats 9

Brown panne velvet hat from Feathers. Chocolate Shetland poloneck sweater by Hogg of Hawick. Suede gaucho pants from Bus Stop. Brown striped hooded floor length wool coat lined with fur fabric by Foale and Tuffin. Belt from Bus Stop.