Inspirational Editorials: Put them together and what have you got?

Put them together - Over 21 - September 1972 - Willie Christie 1

No excuse for looking a wash-out with these rainy-day separates. Showerproof three-quarter length Dannimac cotton jacket. Black Simon Massey shirt. Keep-the-worst-off cotton hat by Malyard. Bouncy beads by Adrien Mann. Bumper sunglasses by Oliver Goldsmith.

Photographed by Willie Christie.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Over 21, September 1972

Put them together - Over 21 - September 1972 - Willie Christie 2

Fabulous shaggy acrylic jacket by Weathergay – believe it or not it’s showerproof. With a pure silk crepe de chine Sujon shirt. Cream wool trousers by Mary Quant. Splash-happy PVC hat from Herbert Johnson. Wet=grass green leather clutch bag by Mulberry Company.

Put them together - Over 21 - September 1972 - Willie Christie 3

Casual-as-they-come trench coat in cotton and polyester from Aquascutum. Lined wool bags by Sujon from Just Looking. Silk shirt from Aquascutum again. Bringing-back-the-sun clutch bag by Mulberry Company. Shoes from Russell and Bromley. Antelope felt hat from Herbert Johnson.

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Inspirational Images: Rose tinted Quant

Looking at life throughu rose-tinted glasses: Mary Quant sees spring in a haze of rose pink, here in Liberty print, straight out of a vicarage garden. It couldn't be more English. Dress, shoes and tights all by Mary Quant. His shirt by Aquascutum. Bangle from City Lights Studio.

Looking at life through rose-tinted glasses: Mary Quant sees spring in a haze of rose pink, here in Liberty print, straight out of a vicarage garden. It couldn’t be more English. Dress, shoes and tights all by Mary Quant. His shirt by Aquascutum. Bangle from City Lights Studio.

Photographed by Norman Eales. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Cosmopolitan, March 1973.


Mensday: Bowled Over

In my teenage years, I developed a bit of a weird thing for cricketers. It was much ridiculed by my peers, but there was just something about the smart trousers, jumpers and lazy, peculiarly English feel of a cricket match which was like some kind of catnip to me.

It has lessened dramatically over the years, but I definitely think it was some kind of reaction to how horridly many men dressed in the town where I grew up. As I met more well-dressed men, I realised I was simply craving smartness, an effort, something ‘different’. So I’m very taken with the snazzy Seventies take on the look in the Aquascutum advert above. The beautiful illustration doesn’t hurt either…

Scanned from the Sunday Telegraph Magazine, May 1977.