Where It’s At

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 h

Plum spotted baker boy hat by Mr Freedom.

Looks: Eyes, hair, lips, the way they are now.

Clothes: Pink and purple and plum – the length is midi of course

Props: The right accessories make the look come right

Mood: How to wear your feelings on your face

Basically, this editorial is everything I wish for from my autumn wardrobe, colours and textures and shapes, complete with a mouthful of chocolate…

Photographed by Roger Stowell.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Honey, October 1970.

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 j

Choker from Browns.

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 f

Left: Lavender shirt with matching midi skirt by Sujon. Canvas boots by Biba. Centre: Parma violet dress by Stirling Cooper. Leather butterfly choker from Browns. Shoes by Saxone. Right: Rose and lilac sweater by Harold Ingram. Jersey midi skirt by Etam. Crochet cloche by Browns. Shoes by Saxone.

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 g

1. Crochet flower cloche by Browns. 2. Plum leather satchel by Wild Mustang. Brooches from Mr Freedom. 3. Conker brown bag by Fenwicks. Leather belt by Wild Mustang. 4. Purple suede shoes by Ravel. 5. Belts from Browns, Wild Mustang and Adrien Mann. 6. Maroon suede boots by Russell and Bromley.

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 a

Crushed velvet cloche by Bermona

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 b

Cloche and dress by Anji. Badge by Mr Freedom.

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 c

Floor sweeping crepe dress by Kadix. Choker from Hope and Eleanor.

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 d

Sweater by John Craig.

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 e

Peasant shirt and midi skirt by Sujon.

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Mother Wouldn’t Like It

Mother Wouldn't Like It

Have just formed a new organisation. It’s called SPOCC or the Society for the Protection of Clothes Customers. Idea came last night when I collected a couple of suits from the cleaners, only to find that the shoulder padding of one jacket was lost somewhere down the sleeve, and the trousers, supposed to be drip dry, were wrinkled like a Dutch dyke. The first suit came from Carnaby Street, the second from the Kings Road. Jose, my flat-mate, tried to pacify me by saying, “I thought you said clothes now are fashionable and short-lived. So what do you expect?” Simply that a suit shouldn’t disappear at the first clean! I accept built-in obsolescence and all those rubbishy excuses for using cheap materials, but I expect a suit to last a year, not a month. How about you? Let me know what you think … it might add up to some interesting revelations. Like the super trousers in the sketch. They’re Newman jeans from France; they cost much more than English or American but, in my view, are twice as good. I got a pair from the Heavy Metal Kids in the Kensington Market for £5. Elsewhere you can pay up to 8 gns. Shirts are another racket. The shirt here looks as if it costs 10 gns., and so it can at some places. In fact, it’s made by a man called Bryan King, who works in a Queensway attic, turning out great shirts handmade, frilled, tapered, for £2—£4, and sells them at his stall, Mother Wouldn’t Like It, also in the Ken Market. The tie-makers have become so ridiculously expensive that ties are out except for the odd occasion, and these shirts are as logical a take-over as the polo sweater. If Bryan can turn them out at this price, why can’t others? Remember—next time you think you’ve been rooked, let Luke SPOCC Jarvis know.

Written by Luke Jarvis.

Illustration by Wendy Buttrose.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Honey, March 1968.


Pretty Things

Pretty Things 3

Left: Green felt hat from Bombacha. Grey crepe top and matching skirt both by Strawberry Studio. Gloves by Tuttabankem. Silk scarf by Eddie Yap for Howie. Right: Navy blue hat by Charles Batten. Green crepe top and matching skirt by Strawberry Studio. Gloves by Tuttabankem. Scarf from Essences. Brooch from Bombacha.

Skirts are big news! They come in soft, pretty fabrics like crepe and flanesta. Looks are soft and sweet too. So go feminine. Wear skirts that are full, and keep warm with chunky sweaters and long, knitted scarves.

Photographed by Arthur Elgort.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, October 1974.

Pretty Things 5

Left: Rust felt hat by Marida. Rust crepe de chine suit by Marie France. Mixed tweedy cardigan by Outlander. Brown leather shoes by Bombacha. Scarf by Eddie Yap for Howie. Bag from Nostalgia. Right: Hat by Edward Mann. Cream blouse and grey crepe de chine suit all by Marie France. Huge grey cardigan by Crochetta. Grey lace up shoes from Sacha. Silky scarf by Eddie Yap for Howie. Brooch from Bombacha.

Pretty Things 1

Left: Hat by Edward Mann. Blouse by Garilee. Wool cardigan by Johnson & Johnson. Skirt from C&A. Shoes from Sacha. Right: Hat from Bombacha. Green blouse by Garilee. Wool v-neck top by Outlander. Cardigan by Johnson & Johnson. Skirt from C&A. Shoes by Sacha. Beads from Bombacha. Brooch by Adrien Mann.

Pretty Things 2

Left: Red and white striped wool tank top and matching cardigan by Outlander. Cream crepe skirt by Mushroom. Right: Flannel beret at Essences. Cream crepe blouse by Jon Elliot. Cream tank top and matching cardigan by C&A. Pale pink crepe skirt by Marie France.

Pretty Things 4

Left: Blue felt hat by Charles Batten. White silk shirt by Carr Jones. Blue cord pinafore dress by Strawberry Studio. Leather shoes from Bombacha. Silk scarf from Essences. Right: Hat from Nostalgia. White Chinese shirt by Carr Jones. Blue tweed hacking jacket by Jenny Hare at Bombacha. Skirt by Inega. Shoes from Bombacha. Bag from Essences. Scarf by Eddie Yap for Howie.


Silks and Satins for at least one third of your life

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Pale violet nightdress from Browns.

A heavenly combination of slinky nightwear, mid-Seventies tech and a very welcoming looking bed arrangement. Oh, and Marie Helvin of course. This is very much how I would like to spend the next few weeks, months… in fact, a third of my life!

Italian ‘Cifra’ bed by Vittorio Rossi & Luciano Bertoncini from Heal’s.

Photographed by David Bailey.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, July 1974.

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White satin de lys pujamas by Liliane Dreyfus for Vog.

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Pale beige crepe nightdress by Stan Herman for Charnos.

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White nightdress by John Kloss for Cira.


Welcome Summer

Welcome Summer - 5 - Jean Claude Volpeliere

Gladrags printed shirt with cotton satin knickerbockers. Plastic and raffia choker by Adrien Mann. Gladrags cotton satin shorts with bib.

Just a quick glance at any of these new mid-year fabrics can lead to all sorts of sunny ideas. Will you take to squashysoft quilting or fall in love with countryside madras printed denim and shiny new satinised cotton? For the romantic there’s beautiful embroidered lawns and more than enough nostalgia in the turn-of-the-century jacquard crepes, woven on precisely the same machines as those of sixty summers past. All ready for you to wear tomorrow — or to keep aside for that long hot summer . . .

Photographed by Jean Claude Volpeliere.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Petticoat, April 1971.

Welcome Summer - 7 - Jean Claude Volpeliere

Little bird print shirt and skirt from Biba. Suede wedge shoes from Sacha. Angora brim hat from Browns.

Welcome Summer - 2 - Jean Claude Volpeliere

Blue quilted shorts and shirt, both from Feathers. Blue suede shoes by Sacha.

Welcome Summer - 3 - Jean Claude Volpeliere

Clobber stars and stripes jacket at Stop the Shop. Bermona denim cap.

Welcome Summer - 1 - Jean Claude Volpeliere

Gillian Richard printed dungarees, smock and matching hat from ’27’. Gillian Richard calico smock with matching dungarees from Snob and Irvine Sellars shops. Herbert Johnson hat. .

Welcome Summer - 4 - Jean Claude Volpeliere

Angela smock dress at Stop the Shop.

Welcome Summer - 6 - Jean Claude Volpeliere

Angela calico farmers smock worn with denim jeans, wellington boots and hat.


Sentimental Journey

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Striped top and matching crepe cardigan. Cream crepe trousers, all by Jackie Ross at Jon Elliot. Clutch bag by Biba. Blue and white striped scarf from Essences. Beige straw hat by Diane Logan / Green,, white and black striped cardigan is a 19 Magazine knitting pattern. Long cream gored skirt by Brave New World. Cream strappy straw sandals from Chelsea Cobbler.

back to romance with nostalgia and nostalgic clothes in romantic settings. Long, flowing scarves, mysterious veils and soft, sensuous fabrics for Sunday strolls or super dates — a wardrobe for summer sentimentalists

Hair by Robert at Ricci Burns.

Photographed by Gian Barberis.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, May 1974.

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Green straw hat by Diane Logan. Green and cream printed crepe de chine dress by Gillian Richard. Cream knitted cardigan from Essences. Grey suede shoes from Bombacha. / Dark green chip straw ht by Diane Logan. Green and cream printed crepe de chine dress by Gillian Richard. Navy blue shoes from Bombacha.

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Cream beret by Kangol. Halter top, matching white and blue silk knitted long cardigan. Matching calf-length knitted skirt all by Lison Bonfils at Joseph. Grey suede shoes from Bombacha. / Salmon pink beret by Kangol. Cream crepe sleeveless top with sequin motif. Matching below-the-knee culottes. Both by Jackie Ross for Jon Elliot. Salmon pink silky cardigan from Essences. Sandals from Chelsea Cobbler.

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Brown felt hat from Nostalgia. Black and white crepe de chine dress by Jeff Banks. Cream cardigan by Essences. Shoes from Bombacha. / White suit with black pattern and reverse on cuffs and collar from Essences. Black suede shoes from Bombacha. Black scarf from Bus Stop.

sentimental journey - gian barberis - 5

Pink straw hat by Diane Logan. Crepe crepe jacket and matching mid-calf skirt by Bus Stop. Cream straw shoes by Chelsea Cobbler. / Black and tan cloche from Diane Logan. V neck top and matching crepe jacket and skirt all from Bus Stop. Straw shoes by Chelsea Cobbler. Scarf to match suit from Bus Stop.


Meet Simon and Marijke – Two of The Beautiful People

the-fool-1The world of pop artists Simon and Marijke is indeed strange—their philosophy is to spread the influence of art over every aspect of civilized society, to produce a world throbbing with colour, light and beautiful things—but are we ready for them and their way of life? Will they make it, or will they disappear into the realms of history? Jeremy Pascall visited them to find out!

Officially the street nameplate says “Montague Square”. Unofficially it says “George Harrison is the best Beatle” in felt-tip pen. Just up the road Patti Harrison’s orange and yellow mini is parked. Beneath the sun-hot pavement of the quiet London square is a cool basement area. Set into the wall is a blue-painted door with gold stars scattered across it. A small sign says “Love, special delivery!”

Behind the door is a large, calm flat, at the centre of which is a big, open room, bright with rainbow paintings, fragrant with incense and flowers, loud with music, and alive with happy, talking, laughing people.

Here two young Dutch painters, Simon and Marijke, hold court. Their boon companions are Barry and Josje. Their courtiers include the Beatles, Mick Jagger, Graham Nash, the Cream and the rest of London’s most beautiful people.

But this is not just a court, it is a painter’s power-house, a beauty factory. Simon, Marijke, Josje and Barry are part of a new generation of artists. Pop artists who are using pop music and stars and fashion to bring their work before us. If you’ve ever seen the Cream, opened the “Sgt. Pepper” cover, or bought the latest Hollies’ album you’ll have seen their work. And you’ll be seeing a lot more of it in the future.

Simon (pronounced Simone) Posthuma is twenty-eight. He was born the year that war broke out, and remembers the Germans being kind to him. “I turned them on”, he said and smiled. This is Simon’s mission, to turn everyone on to beauty and colour.

The son of a policeman (he admits to this with an ironic chuckle; his later life has shown that he and the police don’t always see eye to eye), Simon was an early drop-out, leaving school because “we didn’t under-stand each other”. He then went through every conceivable job. For a time he was an art student, “but they threw me out because they said I had no talent!”

Despite this set-back he continued to paint. “I’ve always painted, experimented, progressed, tried to find what I want to say.” At first his work was conventional landscapes and portraits, but he soon evolved his own highly individual (and now much copied) style of brilliant rainbow colours and patterns.

Four years ago the gently rebellious artist met Marijke (pronounced Marracca) Koger, than a commercial, but not very happy, artist working in an advertising agency. They clicked in every way and started creating happenings with the help of their growing circle of friends consisting of musicians, writers and artists.

Between them Simon and Marijke really stirred up Amsterdam. “We did some crazy, beautiful things, man,” Simon said in his soft, Dutch accent. “We organised evening happenings when we took over a house, and had music and dancing and action painting. One day we went out into the street and painted it gold. Crazy!”

Simon and Marijke were joined in their “rainbow circle” by Josje (pronounced Yosha) Leeger. Josje, an old school friend of Marijke, was already established as a designer in Holland, and her clothes reflect the beautifully bizarre, freely fanciful ideas of the group. The clothes are made of different coloured fabrics and materials. Like styled patchwork quilts and up-dated gypsy costumes, jesters’ motley and troubadours’ shreds and patches.

And so they were three—Simon, Marijke and Josje. They had good things going for them in Amsterdam — a boutique and exhibitions — but they wanted to get out and so Simon and Marijke went to Morocco and Greece and then decided that London was for them.

But at first London wasn’t sure if they were right for it! They weren’t readily accepted. “We got very annoyed about it at first, but then we got to know the people at ‘Granny Takes A Trip’, and through them we met hip P.R. man Barry Finch, who was looking for someone to design the programme for the Saville Theatre.”

Simon and Marijke came, he saw, they conquered, and that was the start! They designed the programme cover for the Saville, started meeting the most influential people in pop, fell under the patronage of the Beatles and never looked back.

Barry became manager of the romantic duo. The Beatles asked them to submit designs for their “Sgt. Pepper” cover. They did the full job, including a fearsome cut-out mask, but only the inner sleeve design was used.

Simon, Marijke, Josje and Barry have created their own little world, a prototype for what they want us all to have. It’s a sprawling, open flat, centred around a long hallway and communal room. Most of the business of living is carried on in this room, where visitors are made welcome. Unlike the classic picture of an artist’s home, the apartment is remarkably clean and tidy.

In the main room, be-decked with samples of their work, Simon and Marijke hold court. A record player in the corner drones Ravi Shankar, “a present from George”. Marijke hands round sweet little Indian cakes—”A present from Ravi”. Somehow the tiny community seems utterly cut off from the bustle of London and it is no surprise when Mick, Marianne and Patti wander in to savour the tranquillity.

Surrounded by the things and the people they love, they gently, persuasively expound their philosophy, and outline their plans.

It is a philosophy based on love. “The essence is love. Love will grow, spread until the whole world is turned on to it. Love will not die. Everybody must turn on.

“There are people who don’t understand and walk away, but the next day they find out a new part of what is happening. To them it appears that it’s all happening at once, but in fact it’s the culmination of years. People react to us; in Paris they shouted rude words at us and we smiled back, but it didn’t happen in London. Anyway we’re in a different society, we mix with people who think like us, we stay in our headquarters all the time, work all the time.

“What is the ultimate? Paradise, living for each other. No dirty cities. We will change back to country communities where money won’t be necessary, we’ll work for each other. Who’ll do all the work? Computers. Eventually computers will show we don’t need computers!

“The old leaders are dying. Soon there will be new leaders. No, not leaders — spiritual mentors. This is the divine plan,” said Simon.

The philosophy sounds muddled and naive but it’s spoken in all sincerity. Simon speaks wonderingly of Eastern mystics who can perform miracles, produce castles out of the air. Charmingly childlike, but they have exciting plans afoot.

There will soon be an exhibition of Simon’s work, followed by the opening of a boutique and a film or theatre venture.

Boutique isn’t quite the word. The shop will be more of an environment. Simon and Marijke think that pop, fashion, art and design have been too separate in the past. They want to bring them all together under one roof. It would be nice to see people walking around in their fabulous clothes, hanging their beautiful paintings on the walls (posters will soon be available) and accepting their philosophy. But are we ready for it yet?

All colour, fun, love, beauty. Gold streets! Why not? That’s how it feels to be one of the beautiful people!

Some wonderful photos of The Fool which I hadn’t seen before. Interesting to read about their plans for their boutique (the-here-unnamed Apple Boutique) which would open only a couple of months after this was published and closed six months later.

Photographer uncredited.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Rave Magazine, September 1967.

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