Where It’s At

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 h

Plum spotted baker boy hat by Mr Freedom.

Looks: Eyes, hair, lips, the way they are now.

Clothes: Pink and purple and plum – the length is midi of course

Props: The right accessories make the look come right

Mood: How to wear your feelings on your face

Basically, this editorial is everything I wish for from my autumn wardrobe, colours and textures and shapes, complete with a mouthful of chocolate…

Photographed by Roger Stowell.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Honey, October 1970.

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 j

Choker from Browns.

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 f

Left: Lavender shirt with matching midi skirt by Sujon. Canvas boots by Biba. Centre: Parma violet dress by Stirling Cooper. Leather butterfly choker from Browns. Shoes by Saxone. Right: Rose and lilac sweater by Harold Ingram. Jersey midi skirt by Etam. Crochet cloche by Browns. Shoes by Saxone.

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 g

1. Crochet flower cloche by Browns. 2. Plum leather satchel by Wild Mustang. Brooches from Mr Freedom. 3. Conker brown bag by Fenwicks. Leather belt by Wild Mustang. 4. Purple suede shoes by Ravel. 5. Belts from Browns, Wild Mustang and Adrien Mann. 6. Maroon suede boots by Russell and Bromley.

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 a

Crushed velvet cloche by Bermona

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 b

Cloche and dress by Anji. Badge by Mr Freedom.

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 c

Floor sweeping crepe dress by Kadix. Choker from Hope and Eleanor.

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 d

Sweater by John Craig.

Where it's at - Roger Stowell - Honey Oct 70 e

Peasant shirt and midi skirt by Sujon.

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Tweedy Autumn Perfection

Skirt by Sujon. Polo by John Craig. Beret by Kangol. Scarf from Van der Fransen.

This spread is everything I love about Autumn and Winter, and how I am often attired. Interesting clothes: textures, colours and embellishments; hats, scarves, tights etc. But sometimes I seem to forget to post more daywear spreads, I suppose because they were often less interestingly photographed and displayed; sometimes even borderline chaotic. But I don’t see why that needs or needed to be. Daytimes can be the most expressive times for me…

This shoot is particularly beautiful and, for me, inspirational.

Photos by Bill Klein. Petticoat, November 1974

Skirt by Wallis Shops. Polo by John Craig. Beret by Kangol. Scarf from Van der Fransen. Shoes by Saxone.

Skirt by Wallis. Sweater by Mushroom. Beret by Kangol. Scarf from Van der Fransen. Sox by Kickers. Saxone shoes.

Skirt by Left Bank. Sweater by John Craig. Beret by Kangol. Scarf from “208″ SW10. Shoes by Saxone

Skirt by City Swingers. Sweater from Leaves. Quant sox. Shoes by Elliott.

Tweed skirt and hat from Bombacha. Polo from Dorothy Perkins. Shoes by Saxone.

Velvet skirt by Stirling Cooper. Shirt by John Craig. Waistcoat from Dorothy Perkins. Beret from Marida.


Psssst…..

Vogue. September 1970

…is it wrong to secretly be longing for it to be autumn?

Perhaps I bore too easily. More likely, it’s because I can’t bear being too hot. And, also, because I bore easily. I love my summer dresses, and there’s nothing quite like being able to leave the house without a jacket, cardigan and sometimes even sans shawl. But that very human tendency to want what you can’t have means that I start looking longingly at my long-sleeved crepe, velvet and polyester dresses, all taking a well-earned summer holiday. I keep having to bare my legs to the world. I miss tights! I also long to come out the other side of ‘ironing season’. Because I’m extremely pernickety and I insist on ironing all my cotton dresses, so that is rather my own fault. But still…

It also means that, gripped by the blindingly bad mood of a Really Bad Week (last week), I somehow wander into the shops and somehow buy the pair of buckled suede purple platforms I’ve been coveting since they appeared in store in June (when I was, officially, looking for a pretty pair of sandals for my holiday). Somehow I justify this by the fact that I waited three weeks, and that they might disappear by a more appropriate buying time. It’s less ridiculous to buy them in July than in June. I’ve had my summer holiday, ergo I can start thinking about an autumn getaway and the pretty suede shoes I might need for that. Ahem.

On a more practical, businesslike level, it also means I am gripped by confusion on what to list over at Vintage-a-Peel. Summer is pretty much silly season for vintage. No one is around and no one is really buying summer stuff once mid-July hits. At least, that’s always been the received wisdom. But, as a business, I cannot take a school holiday-length break from the world and come back in September with all my velvets and crepes. So I have to keep going.

High Street and designer shops are horribly clever. They know, that you know, that they will ensure that the most covetable pieces are going to sell out before you are ready. And so you pounce, and they can actually make money in hot and stinky August (after they’ve made their money in hot and stinky July when you’re throwing money at their summer sales. Often featuring items which have been in the summer sales for three years running as well).

I still haven’t come to any conclusion about this, in case you were wondering whether I had discovered the answer, I am just musing aloud. But, in case anyone feels the same way, I just wanted to make my confession. I’m really looking forward to the autumn.

Outfit by Bernshaw. Suede hat by Herbert Johnson. Shoes uncredited.


Outfit by Anji. Vest by Mr Freedom. Amazing shoes uncredited.


Outfit by Firstaway. Boots by Granny Takes a Trip. Vest by Mr Freedom.


Outfit by Reldan. Boots by Granny Takes a Trip


Outfit by Polly Peck. Boots by Noddy’s Nipple in The Kensington Market.

[not so crazy about this outfit, but I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to credit those boots to the delightfully named ‘Noddy’s Nipple’]

Advertisement feature from Vogue for Acrilan fabrics by various manufacturers. Make-up by Max Factor and photos by Barry Lategan.