The Grand Affair

Grand affairs call for grand clothes, and provide a welcome opportunity to get out of our peasant blouses and jeans and dress accordingly. The nicest thing about fashion at the moment is that everyone is so confused as to what they should be wearing, that you can wear exactly what you like. We opt for the romantic Garbo fashion, tarted up in the ’71 style, because girls are beginning to look like girls again and, although we sympathise with Women’s Lib., we don’t believe you have to look like a fella to get equal rights!

Possibly the most perfect encapsulation of the Seventies-does-Thirties aesthetic, this homage to Art Deco features some of the most lust-worthy clothes from my favourite designers and boutiques. Including Biba, Ossie Clark and some rare Antony Price for Stirling Cooper!

Photographed in the home of interior designer Graeme Gibson rather than in a studio, the authenticity is heightened by the location and the props, and then finished with the sweet illustrated photoframes.

Photographed by David Tack.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from 19 Magazine, January 1971.

grand affair 3

Crepe dress by Antony Price for Stirling Cooper. T-strap shoes from Sacha.

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Inspirational Illustrations: Eric Boman, 1974

Grey wool cardigan, oatmeal overchecked, pale grey silk shirt, both at James Drew. Grey felt hat by Edward Mann.

Grey wool cardigan, oatmeal overchecked, pale grey silk shirt, both at James Drew. Grey felt hat by Edward Mann.

Meet the new fashion collector. She will be about for a long time. Her lipstick is red. She wears only navy, ivory and grey, but so cleverly that there’s no limit to the flattering effects she can compute. Her clothes are so simple and beautiful. It all looks easy. She spends more money on her clothes than most woman, but, when they’re searching around for something to wear, she’s already perfectly dressed. When their clothes are beginning to look wrong, hers are right. So in the end, she probably spends no more than they. Here’s how she does it…

Illustrated by Eric Boman.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, February 1974.

Left: Muffler, long cardigan with scroll embroidery, sleeveless putty crepe de chine gilet, skirt loosely pleated in front at Annacat. Hat by Jacoll. Right: Ivory crepe de chine open-work dress, couldn't be simpler, tied at the waist by Salvador. Straw hat by Bermona.

Left: Muffler, long cardigan with scroll embroidery, sleeveless putty crepe de chine gilet, skirt loosely pleated in front at Annacat. Hat by Jacoll. Right: Ivory crepe de chine open-work dress, couldn’t be simpler, tied at the waist by Salvador. Straw hat by Bermona.


Inspirational Interiors: Join the Gatsby Girl at Home

Lois Chiles relaxes with a glass of white wine, looking every inch the rising star. Bed strewn with cushions acts as extra seating, huge mirror tiles make the room look twice as large. Glass dressing table shelf laden with old scent bottles, lovingly collected over the years.

Lois Chiles relaxes with a glass of white wine, looking every inch the rising star. Bed strewn with cushions acts as extra seating, huge mirror tiles make the room look twice as large. Glass dressing table shelf laden with old scent bottles, lovingly collected over the years.

What every working girl deserves is somewhere pretty and peaceful to come home to — especially a girl who has been slaving from six a.m. in front of studio arc tights. Lois Chiles, a beautiful brunette cover girl now making ripples in the film The Great Gatsby, has created the kind of apartment — from an ordinary two-room flat – that is as soothing at the end of the day as a glass of pink champagne. The secret of the film star glamour is simple, and not expensive to copy; Lois chose pale, pretty colours that do as much for the complexion as Elizabeth Arden. So forget the drab browns and beiges of our current good taste era! Sugar pink softens the walls and clear yellow makes the standard windows found in blocks of flats something worth looking at — as well as out of. Lois adds her own handwriting with rows of framed photographs. A few junk shop finds — like the Odeon—style chair and old scent bottles — banks of flowery cushions and more flowers and plants than most career girls can afford. Still, a film star deserves her perks…

Photographs by Robert Perron. Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Cosmopolitan, May 1974

Odeon-style chair and art deco ashtray make a stylish duo: Lois reupholstered her junk shop find in this pretty pastel shade.

Odeon-style chair and art deco ashtray make a stylish duo: Lois reupholstered her junk shop find in this pretty pastel shade.

Latticed windows in the living room let in lots of light. A gallery of favourite photos and a vaseful of roses add film-star glamour.

Latticed windows in the living room let in lots of light. A gallery of favourite photos and a vaseful of roses add film-star glamour.


Inspirational Images: Lounging in Deco

piguet advert

“Is it so shameless”, she murmered, “to be so sure of something so expensive?”

Detail from Audemar Piguet watch advert.

Photographed by Rolph Gobits (originally from the same shoot as one featured in the Big Biba newspaper in 1973. Thanks to Sweet Jane for confirming this).

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Harpers and Queen, December 1978


Vintage Adverts: Very Robert Carrier; very Sanderson.

sanderson carrier

Photographed at Hintlesham Hall, Suffolk

Oh I do love this series of Sanderson adverts, including Diana Rigg and Britt Ekland, and this four poster bed with its most extraordinary Biba-esque Art Deco inspired fabric is just a dream. I am not ashamed to say, I love spending time in bed; lolling around and generally keeping the real world well and truly out. And this would be the most perfect haven of a boudoir…

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from The Daily Telegraph Magazine, 4th May 1973


Inspirational Illustrations: What You’ll Be Into

Illustration by Michael Roberts. 19 Magazine, January 1973.

. . . in 1973. Life is beautiful, the girls are beautiful, the clothes are beautiful. In fact, life, 1973-style, is a cabaret and here we present the cabaret-girls, with a few tips – picked up at the Paris fashion shows – on how to dress the part without using up too much money 

LEFT TO RIGHT: Martine in a chemise dress inspired by Roland Chakkal at Mendes. Make one yourself from a ‘Twenties‘ slip. She amuses herself by.toying with her cigarette holder (held just for show), while listening to the jangling of her nine A bangles. Her drop-earrings glitter, her tight bead choker sparkles and one arm is snug in its elbow-length glove. 

Janine tangos giddily with her partner. but nevertheless looks chic in a little soup-plate hat, perched jauntily over a printed scarf inspired by Karl Lagerfeld at Chloe. Thrown into a state of ecstasy by the Jap Collection, she has naturally teamed a long striped jumper with a neat box-pleated skirt.

Her partner, in pinstriped suit (inspired by designer Dorothée Bis), white-wing collar and bow tie (available in father`s top drawer), wears drop-earrings as a concession to femininity. 

Neatly fandangoing into the spotlight – Katherine and Margaret. Katherine’s favourite designer is Karl Lagerfeld at Chloe. How right then for her to be attired in printed bra top and skirt. But paradox, paradox. She also fell in love with the stripey pixie hat seen at Dorothee Bis. Happily, she’s thrown caution to the wind and wears them together. 

Margaret looks soulful. That is the only way one can look in an eye-shading, pull-on hat, all the rage for lovers of designer Emmanuelle Khanh

Zizi, as always, simply had to be different. A monocle. Only she could get away with this, but the rest of her accessories should be simple to copy.


Barbara Hulanicki: Art Deco W14

A section of the studio. Beneath the gallery one discovers a sink, kettle. cooker below a thirties’ Grecian frieze. Art Deco chairs in peach moquette. Screen, with beaded shawl. purple plastic  grapes behind a delicate nasturtium-leaf lamp hung with beaded fringe
Barbara Hulanicki at home in one cavernous studio which she found three years ago and filled with Art Deco from floor to ceiling. Walls, ceiling, stairs, all painted a rich matt brown, merge into the shadowy interior; angles and lines are softened and blurred. Colours, not walls, mark out living areas, a different shade for each section of space. Light is filtered through the brown-tinted glass of the high, patterned perpendicular window and a long fanlight in the roof. A brown spiral staircase, leafy with plastic twisting plants, leads to a long gallery which forms the dressing-rooms. Everywhere, an endlessly intricate arrangement of colour, pattern, space; a deep, dark brown jungle of the ornamental, the exotic, the glittering.

Photos by James Mortimer. Vogue, October 1975.
The dressing-room. Shades of peach and deepest brown, Creamy lighting from bulbs set behind opaque glass. Peach mirrors hung with beads, the dressing table, a darker shade of smoked peach, made up of tiny individual drawers. Stool topped with smoked peach glass.
The bath, a riot of peach and plastic flowers. Ornate brass taps, Art Deco screen. Brilliant blue glass, candlesticks and pearly plastic grapes.
Barbara Hulanicki in the sitting-room, the window open to reveal a jungle of climbing plants outside. In the background, a collection of Art Deco glass below the enormous mirror, at least six feet in diameter. Everywhere lamps, small, fringed or mushroom-topped on long, slender stems: everywhere figures, ferns, flowers. In foreground, a set of black/silver/turquoise vases and modelled head on decorated brass tray and glass-sided table: replica of a twenties’ cigarette girl, now bearing a tray of jewellery.
Looking down from the gallery into the studio, arranged into its separate “rooms”
The bed, above, hung with shawls, scattered with sequinned brocaded cushions. Barbara Hulanicki reflected in the bedside mirror on the writing desk and in the centre of the mirrored bed-head. On the right, a peach mirror flex set of shelves, with photographs, figures, eight Art Deco plastic handbags.