All Dyed Up

All dyed up 6

Velvet tie-dye dress from Mr Freedom. Canvas boots from Biba.

All sorts of things are getting the tie and dye treatment this summer – and we bet it will colour our autumn too! It’s easy to tie-dye jeans and t-shirts, just tie a knot anywhere, grab a packet of dye, and you’re away! But the experts have been getting at everything so you can buy it already dyed – summer colour has hit jersey, velvet and gaberdine to. So get dyeing!

Photographed by David Finch.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Petticoat, July 1970

All dyed up 1

Tie-dye vest by Miss Impact. Satin tie-dye pants from Gordon King. Woolworth plimsolls. Bus Stop cloche. Belt from Consortium.

All dyed up 2

Tie-dye vest from Miss Impact. Biba canvas boots. Lilac snakeskin belt from Bus Stop.

All dyed up 4

Tie-dye pants and top by London Mob. Specs from Corocraft. Knee socks from Bus Stop. Plimsolls from Woolworths.

All dyed up 5

Dress by Miss Impact. Socks from Bus Stop. Glasses from Biba. Plimsolls from Woolworths.

All dyed up 7

Satin tie-dye suit by Gordon King. Biba specs. Sandals by Xanthe leather.


Painted Lady

Painted Lady - Barry Lategan

…contrived in Van Dongen colours.

Gala Mitchell photographed by Barry Lategan.

Make-up by Estee Lauder. Hair by Daniel and Oliver of Leonard.

Black straw hat and ivory satin-ribboned blouse from Sharron’s Shoppe, Kensington Market.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Beauty In Vogue, 1970.


A great straw shade

A great straw shade

Khaki cotton jersey swimsuit with fantail fish on shoulder and hip, by Jap. Hat by Jean-Charles Brosseau for Jap. Gold shoes by Manolo Blahnik.

Photographed by Willie Christie.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, April 1977.


The Great Jewel Robbery

The Great Jewel Robbery 1

Some men may wince at the thought of wearing anything more flash than an Alfa Romeo watch. And some girls will weep at the prospect of spending any of their salary on him. But there’s no doubt that a good deal of gilt-edged swopping is going on among the sexes. And I don’t mean that trad plain gold band. Much more interesting is the trend for loving couples to buy each other jewellery that they both can wear. It began a few years ago with gilt and elephant-hair rings that the likes of Twiggy and Justin used to sport. Then the Together People began exchanging chunky under-water watches and Cartier’s gold “love” bangles. Very simple, very expensive and very permanent because they are fastened with a screwdriver. Now that even jet-setters are uniformed like Steve McQueen in blue jeans, the latest swop-about jewellery is suitably chunky and shiny as a Harley-Davidson bike—see above: Peter Hinwood in a silver chain and bracelet from Andre Bogaert and ivory tusks from Butler and Wilson. The ear-ring is his own. Janni Goss is weighed down with two chromium bangles by Gijis Bakker, a stainless-steel belt by Emanuel Raft and a silver pendant by Helga Zahn. All one-offs and available at the Electrum Gallery, where customers include Julie Christie and Fenella Fielding. The girls order for themselves and their fellas. Gals and guys who prefer their jewellery on the frankly flash side—and they include Yoko and John Lennon—apply to Mick Milligan who designs the glitter stuff, worn by Barbara Trentham. and Gary Myers, below. Mick designs with his tongue in his cheek, like the BLANG! pins and the Rolls-Royce radiator badge, made in solid silver for Leonard, the London hairdresser, which Leonard’s wife also borrows. For females only: the “Diamonds are a girl’s best friend” necklet—naturally 100 per cent fake stones—which Barbara wears with a fistful of chrome rings. From a fiver each, you can tell Mick’s loot is more than a joke. Meanwhile he is laughing all the way to the bank, so BLANG! to you. Lurex knit is by Christopher McDonnell.

Photographed by Norman Eales. Text by Deirdre McSharry.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Cosmopolitan, March 1972.

The Great Jewel Robbery 2


Contemporary Wardrobe by Sheila Rock

Ramona Mo-Dette by Sheila Rock

1959: Ramona/Bright Young Thing. Influences: Vogue, Irving Penn, High Society, Barbara Golan, Paris couture. Ivory plant pot hat; ivory silk abstract rose print dress; ivory leather handbag; ivory leather fake lizard stilettos; tortoise-shell cigarette holder; white make-up and vivid red lipstick. To be seen around town, having tea at Fortnum & Mason or the Savoy.

“Contemporary Wardrobe, run by Roger Burton from a warehouse at London Bridge, fit up the stars of small and big screen. They specialise in clothes from 1945 to the present day, supplying outfits and accessories to customers in movies, TV, video, commercials, theatres and advertising agencies,, with some private hiring for parties, posing and…well, that’s their business. The clothes in Quadrophenia came from Contemporary Wardrobe; others have been on hire to Not The Nine O’Clock News, Minder, The Professionals, Dreams of Leaving, The Kenny Everett Video Show, The History Man, Shoestring and Mackenzie. Thy have also kitted out Freeez, Secret Affair, M, Wings and Judas Priest for Top of the Fops and promotional videos, and clothed the sleeves of Motorhead, Girlschool, Marianne Faithfull and Yellow Magic Orchestra. Most other huge collection is authentic, as are all the clothes and the majority of accessories in these photos commissioned, clothed, posted and photographed specially for The Face by Sheila Rock. CW also offer a research department to assist styling and offer technical advice an an express service to reproduce garment or outfits or specific projects. Couldn’t they do something about Doyle’s jackets an Bodie’s flairs [sic]?”

Before there was vintage, there were just old clothes! Superb shoot by Sheila Rock for The Face, June 1981.

John Cooper Clarke by Sheila Rock

1967: John Cooper Clarke/Regency Beau. Influences: elegance, Beau Brummel, Brian Jones, Town Magazine, LSD. Claret velvet suit hand-tailored; pink frilly shirt by John Stephen; patent spat boots by Bally; paisley cravat, crucifix ,cameo, birds foot brooch, jet beads ,silver top cane ,gloves, white make-up, mascara and back combed hair all essential to create the Look for promenading Carnaby Street and Portobello Road to acquire the odd fairground horse or exotic sign from Trad Alices or Lord Kitchener’s Valet. Photo taken at Trad Antiques in Portobello Road

Ranking Roger by Sheila Rock

1950: Ranking Roger/Zoot. Influences: Charlie Parker, the Zou-Zou movement in France, Puerto Rican chic, Wyatt Earp. Grey bird’s eye double breasted Zoot suit; eau-de-nil impressed cotton shirt; brown velour homburg; slim red bow tie; white buckskin brogues by Lillywhites; silver watch chain, silver key chin. Characters wearing this look could be seen around smoky jazz clubs and pool halls all through the ’40s and early ’50s in Harlem. Now adapted by the Chicanos in South America, who rive around in Low Rider cars of the period.


Celtic Summer

Fire Red Paisley - Norman Parkinson

Fire red paisley for a Celtic summer: The haunted house at Parc, near Afon Crosesor, where ghostly things happen all the time. Wild red flickering skirt, paisley and red gold organdie blouse with gold Turkish bodice. Skirt, blouse and top to order from Thea Porter. Fire red boots by Elliott. Sash pin from Ken Lane. Amber beads ,wrist scarf and long red scarf by Ascher.

Photographed by Norman Parkinson.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Vogue, July 1969.


Mild Sauce: High Rise

naru inui creative photography

Photographed by Naru Inui.

Scanned by Miss Peelpants from Creative Photography by Michael Busselle, 1977.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,569 other followers